failure-to-rescue

failure-to-rescue

(făl′yĕr-too-rĕs′kū),

FTR

Loss of life among hospitalized patients resulting from inadequate recognition and treatment of life-threatening complications. FTR is correlated with high ratios of patients to nurses and with psychological variables (e.g., burnout). It has been used, along with complication rates of surgery and other criteria, as an indicator of the quality of hospital care.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Failure-to-Rescue: Comparing Definitions to Measure Quality of Care." Medical Care 45 (10): 918-25.
the higher the percentage of BSN nurses the lower the odds on patient deaths and failure-to-rescue (p.
(3,4) Other research has shown a significant association between higher proportions of RNs on medical and surgical units, lower lengths of stay, and Lower "failure-to-rescue" indicators in 799 United States (US) hospitals.
A 2002 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that in hospitals with a high patient-to-nurse ratio, surgical patients experience higher risk-adjusted 30-day mortality and failure-to-rescue rates, and nurses are more likely to experience burnout and job dissatisfaction.
For every 10% increase in RNs there is a 27% decrease in failure-to-rescue and we have wards in NSW where the percentage of RNs is already below 50%.
The patients studied did not include all patients but were limited to risk-adjusted patient mortality and failure-to-rescue within 30 days of admission.
What remains unknown is whether racial disparities also extend to major complications and failure-to-rescue (death after a major complication) (Silber et al.
A review of current and emerging approaches to address failure-to-rescue. Anesthesiology,, 115(2), 421-431.
Linda Aiken, PhD, RN, was able to demonstrate in her 1993 study published in JAMA that in hospitals with high patient-to-nurse ratios, surgical patients experienced higher risk-adjusted 30-day mortality and failure-to-rescue rates, and nurses were more likely to experience burnout and job dissatisfaction.
Failure-to-rescue (FR) refers to the inability to save a patient's life after the development of a complication (Aiken, Clarke, Sloane, Sochalski, & Silber, 2002; Clarke & Aiken, 2003; Needleman, Buerhaus, Mattke, Stewart, & Zelevinsky, 2002; Silber, Rosenbaum, Schwartz, Ross, & Williams, 1995; Silber, Williams, Krakauer, & Schwartz, 1992).
However, the low- and medium-volume tertiles were combined and then compared with the high-volume category after preliminary analyses revealed no differences in mortality and failure-to-rescue rates between the low- and medium-volume groups.