fact of life


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fact of life

n. pl. facts of life
1. Something unavoidable that must be faced or dealt with.
2. facts of life The basic physiological functions involved in sex and reproduction. Often used with the.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rolling blackouts and rotating outages are a fact of life for our California readers and a distinct possibility for others in some metropolitan areas, Be an energy efficient employee and turn down, turn off and conserve to avoid problems in your laboratory.
After all, government pressure on the central banks is already a fact of life in this new era.
Most motorists now accept that the 80p litre is a fact of life, and many are now looking at buying a modern turbo-diesel to cut their motoring costs.
The overriding message in the chief building inspector's advisory is that moisture intrusion is a fact of life in poorly constructed homes.
Diversity in job descriptions is a fact of life for Bowers, installation travel officer for the past six years.
The idea is utterly repulsive and irrational, yet during the last 35 years it seems to have established itself as a 'fact of life'.
THE FIRST FACT OF LIFE that every player you coach must learn right at the start is that all of the 120 minutes of his two-hour practice have to be organized to ensure an efficient and constructive workout.
Dispersion of yearling bucks in and out of your hunting area is simply a fact of life. Research has shown that when a buck is 12 to 18 months old, he most likely will move to a new home range.
Recounting that product recalls had been a fact of life for her as PR counselor to consumer food manufacturers, Resnick says the key to stress management in our profession is to "preempt." One has to "do the right things right and then your blood pressure should stay as low as it can be." She gives an example from media relations practice: "When you do a set of 'questions and answers' - and think of almost every question - a reporter would ask, and have a statement for each question, then your executives are not taken by surprise and you don't have to worry about what they are going to say.
It is a fact of life that some employees will never embrace or internalize a strategic plan that calls for significant change.
In this book's final chapter, "Nationalism and Feminism: Palestinian Women and the Intifada," Nahla Abdo claims, "In almost all liberation movements where women were actively involved, a general reversal of their roles became the fact of life after national liberation and the establishment of the nation-state." Americans might remember Abigail Adams pleading with her husband to "remember the ladies." And we all must remember the challenging, continuing connection between feminism and racism in this country.
ISO 9000 is now also a fact of life for suppliers to the U.S.