facial spasm


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Related to facial spasm: Hemifacial spasm

fa·cial tic

involuntary twitching of the facial muscles, sometimes unilateral.

fa·cial tic

(fā'shăl tik)
Involuntary twitching of the facial muscles, sometimes unilateral.
Synonym(s): Bell spasm, facial spasm, palmus (1) , prosopospasm.

facial spasm

Spasm of the muscles supplied by the facial nerve, affecting one side of the face or the region around the eye.
See: cranial nerve; tic
See also: spasm
References in periodicals archive ?
[ClickPress, Wed Jul 31 2019] Worldwide prevalence of facial spasm is 9.8 per 100,000, increasing prevalence of this disorder is expected to drive the growth of facial spasm treatment market.
[USPRwire, Tue Jul 30 2019] Facial spasm or hemifacial spasm is frequent involuntary contraction of facial muscles on one side of face.
She said: "Rachael has irritable bowel syndrome, David has a lump behind his eye which causes facial spasms and Gary suffers from type one diabetes and behavioural problems.
"Then in 1996 an eye surgeon in Canada noticed patients who were being treated with Botox for facial spasms had fewer wrinkles.
She had no recent history of upper respiratory infection, pulsatile tinnitus, vertigo, disequilibrium, otalgia, hemifacial weakness, paresthesia, or facial spasms.
The toxin can also relieve the pain and restore normal functioning to people with facial spasms, which pull the face out of shape, and spasmodic torticollis, which the neck and shoulder muscles pull the head to one side.
Now, at the Botox Clinic at the University of North Carolina Hospitals, doctors are using it to treat such neuromuscular disorders as blepharospasm, torticollis, cerebral palsy, facial spasms, laryngeal dystonia, and even writer's cramp.
Margaret, aged 59, from Woodfield Close, Norton Canes, said dystonia causes her to blink rapidly and suffer facial spasms.
His coverage includes treatments for migraine, facial spasms, drooling, lingual and cervical dystonia, spasticity or dystonia in the upper extremities, including adducted thumbs and writer's cramp, spasticity or dystonia in the lower extremities, including the valgus foot and extended knee, pain syndromes ranging from myofascial pain and thoracic outlet syndrome to neuropathic cutaneous pain and lateral epicondylitis, and hyperhidrosis of the forehead and scalp, axillae, palms, residual limbs and feet.