viscerocranium

(redirected from facial skeleton)

vis·cer·o·cra·ni·um

(vis'ĕr-ō-krā'nē-ŭm), [TA]
That part of the cranium derived from the embryonic pharyngeal arches; comprises the facial bones of the facial skeleton (under bone) and is distinct from that part of the cranium that forms the neurocranium (braincase).
[viscero- + cranium]

viscerocranium

the facial skeleton.

vis·cer·o·cra·ni·um

(vis'ĕr-ō-krā'nē-ŭm) [TA]
That part of the cranium derived from the embryonic pharyngeal arches; comprises the facial bones.

vis·cer·o·cra·ni·um

(vis'ĕr-ō-krā'nē-ŭm) [TA]
That part of the cranium derived from embryonic pharyngeal arches.
Synonym(s): facial skeleton, jaw skeleton.
[viscero- + cranium]

viscerocranium (vis´ərōkrā´nēum),

n the category of the 14 bones of the human skull that encircle the face. Also called the
facial bones.
References in periodicals archive ?
Surgical Approaches to the Facial Skeleton, 3rd Edition (online access included)
During surgery, if you are wearing these glasses, you can see the internal anatomy of the patient it's like looking through the skin of the face, you can see the facial skeleton, the muscles, the nerves, the vessels and so on," Ismayil Ferzeliyev, doctor, Azerbaijan Medical University told Euronews.
Maxillofacial injuries ranges from isolated injuries involving only one or two components of the facial skeleton to complex facial injuries of the entire facial skeleton.
8 One of the most important cephalometric parameter giving an indication about the vertical growth pattern and symmetry of facial skeleton is gonial angle.
Mandible, being the only mobile bone of facial skeleton plays a major role in mastication, speech and deglutition.
Because of continued growth of the facial skeleton, some children may need additional craniofacial surgery years after the face transplant.
Owing to the excellent blood supply in the facial skeleton, healing occurs rapidly through brisk proliferation of the cellular layer of the periosteum.
The earliest blueprint of the facial skeleton is set up by spatially intersecting signals that control when stem cells turn into cartilage or bone.
All subcutaneous structures were intact: an X-ray of the facial mass showed that the two halves of the facial skeleton were symmetrical and regularly developed.
The surgeons recreated a 3D virtual model of the young man's facial skeleton to be used as operative guide before, during and after surgery, thus allowing doctors to reconstruct and navigate smoothly and carefully.