facial schwannoma

facial schwannoma

a schwannoma arising from the facial nerve.
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Infectious Acute OM Chronic OM Cholesteatoma Herpes zoster oticus Lyme disease Traumatic Temporal bone fracture Iatrogenic injury Avulsion at brainstem Penetrating trauma Neoplastic Facial schwannoma Vestibular schwannoma Hemangioma Lipoma Glomus tumors Malignancy of skin/parotid Congenital Moebius syndrome Displacement (atresia) Aural atresia CHARGE syndrome Dehiscence of FC Vascular MCA infarct Pontine artery infarct Lacunar infarct Idiopathic Bell's palsy Multiple sclerosis Sarcoidosis Inflammatory Guillain-Barre OM: otitis media; FC: fallopian canal; and MCA: middle cerebral artery.
On CISS images, facial schwannomas will appear as nodular lesions along the nerve within the CPA or IAC.
Only one other report exists describing stereotactic irradiation specifically for the treatment of a facial schwannoma. (1) Facial nerve neoplasms are not typically selected for treatment with this modality because of the concern that direct irradiation to the facial nerve could cause significant and permanent facial nerve dysfunction.
The authors are only aware of one other case report of stereotactic irradiation used for the treatment of facial schwannoma. (1) Apprehension regarding the use of stereotactic irradiation for these tumors is fueled by legitimate concerns that radiation can induce microvasculitis and axonal degeneration in target neural tissue?
Facial schwannomas are very slow growing and are often diagnosed in patients with normal facial nerve function.
Although facial palsy is the most common clinical symptom of a facial schwannoma, some patients do not experience facial paralysis.
Glomus tympanicum is classically seen along the cochlear promontory and facial schwannomas will occur along the course of the facial nerve.
Facial schwannomas may extend onto the labyrinthine portion of the facial nerve and demonstrate associated enhancement and enlargement of the facial canal (Figure 13B).