facial palsy


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Related to facial palsy: Facial paralysis

palsy

 [pawl´ze]
Bell's palsy see bell's palsy.
birth palsy birth paralysis.
cerebral palsy see cerebral palsy.
crossed leg palsy palsy of the fibular nerve, caused by sitting with one leg crossed over the other.
Erb's palsy (Erb-Duchenne palsy) Erb-Duchenne paralysis.
facial palsy Bell's palsy.
shaking palsy Parkinson's disease.

fa·cial pa·ral·y·sis

paresis or paralysis of the facial muscles, usually unilateral, due to either a lesion involving either the nucleus or the facial nerve peripheral to the nucleus (peripheral facial paralysis) or a supranuclear lesion in the cerebrum or upper brainstem (central facial paralysis); with the latter, facial weakness is usually partial and the upper portion of the face is relatively spared, because of bilateral cortical connections.

Bell’s palsy

Acute peripheral paralysis of the face due to a herpes simplex immune-mediated condition, often characterised by severe pain arising in the trigeminal nerve, the chief sensory nerve of the face, which arises in cranial nerve VII.
 
Clinical findings
Abrupt onset, drooping mouth, unblinking eye, twisted nose, uneven smile, distorted expressions; paralysis hits maximum in 1 to 14 days; retroauricular pain, facial numbness, epiphora, parageusia, decreased tearing, hyperacusis, hypoesthesia or dysesthesia of cranial nerves (CN V and IX), motor paresis of CN IX and X, papillitis of tongue.
 
Epidemiology
Risk of Bell’s palsy increases with age; age 10 to 19, 2:1 female:male ratio; age 40, 3:2 men:women ratio; pregnant women have 3.3 times increased risk than nonpregnant; DM = 4.5 times increased risk of BP; 10% of patients have positive family Hx of BP.
 
DiffDx, unilateral
Tumours or masses, otitis media, sarcoid, Lyme disease, skull fracture, facial injury.
 
DiffDx, bilateral
Guillain-Barré syndrome, Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, Möbius syndrome, motor neuron disease, myasthenia gravis.

Aetiology
Trauma, Bell’s palsy, stroke, parotid tumours, intracranial tumours.
 
Management
Microvascular and micro-neurosurgical tissue transfers allow restoration of functional, unconscious, symmetrical facial movements; acyclovir; steroids (uncertain efficacy); artificial tears; neuromuscular retraining—e.g., mirror/visual feedback, biofeedback or electromyography feedback.
 
Prognosis
60 to 80% recover, especially if incomplete paralysis, and patient is young.

facial palsy

Bell's palsy, cranial mononeuropathy VII, facial mononeuropathy, facial nerve palsy, facial neuralgia Neurology Acute peripheral paralysis of the face due to a herpes simplex immune-mediated condition often characterized by severe pain in the trigeminal nerve Epidemiology Risk of FP ↑ with age; age 10 to 19, 2:1, ♀:♂; age 40, 3:2, ♂:♀; pregnant ♀ have 3.3 times ↑ risk than nonpregnant; DM = 4.5 times↑ risk of FP; 10% of Pts have positive family Hx of FP Pathogenesis FP is due to reactivation of the virus leading to replication of virus within the ganglion cells; the virus travels down the axons, inducing inflammation Clinical Abrupt onset, drooping mouth, unblinking eye, twisted nose, uneven smile, distorted expressions; paralysis hits maximum in 1 to 14 days; retroauricular pain, facial numbness, epiphora, parageusia, ↓ tearing, hyperacusis, hypoesthesia or dysesthesia of cranial nerves–CN V and IX, motor paresis of CN IX and X, papillitis of tongue DiffDx, unilateral Tumors or masses, otitis media, sarcoid, Lyme disease, skull fracture, facial injury DiffDx, bilateral Guillain-Barré syndrome, Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, Möbius syndrome, motor neuron disease, myasthenia gravis Etiology Trauma, Bell's palsy, stroke, parotid tumors, intracranial tumors Management Microvascular and micro-neurosurgical tissue transfers allow restoration of functional, unconscious, symmetrical facial movements, acyclovir, steroids–efficacy is uncertain, artificial tears, neuromuscular retraining–eg, mirror/visual feedback, biofeedback or electromyography feedback Prognosis 60 to 80% recover, especially if incomplete paralysis, and Pt is young

fa·cial pa·ral·y·sis

(fā'shăl păr-al'i-sis)
Paresis or paralysis of the facial muscles, usually unilateral, due to either a lesion involving the nucleus of the facial nerve or a supranuclear lesion in the cerebrum or upper brainstem.
See also: Bell palsy
Synonym(s): facial palsy, facioplegia, prosopoplegia.

facial palsy

See BELL'S PALSY.

fa·cial pa·ral·y·sis

(fā'shăl păr-al'i-sis)
Paresis or paralysis of facial muscles, usually unilateral, due to either a lesion involving either nucleus or facial nerve peripheral to nucleus or supranuclear lesion in cerebrum or upper brainstem. Causes include Bell palsy, stroke, brain tumor, sarcoidosis, Lyme disease, infection, and birth trauma in affected newborns.
Synonym(s): facial palsy, facioplegia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our group was a runner-up in last year's ECHO Awards, which really helped us raise awareness about facial palsy.
The result was the standard measurement tool that allows the recording of outcomes following facial palsy treatment, surgical and non-surgical, for paediatric patients.
Two days after the onset of facial palsy, elevated levels of specific anti-VZV IgG and IgM were observed by ELISA assay and complement fixation test.
According to a Freedom of Information request made by them, only 12 per cent of clinical commissioning groups routinely fund surgery for facial palsy.
In conclusion, peripheral facial palsy, although rare, can be a neurological complication of varicella and should be kept in mind.
Here, we reported a case of MS with unilateral facial palsy and bilateral abducens nerve palsy.
Adour et al studied the role of steroids in arresting the progression of incomplete facial palsy to complete one.
Conclusion: An individualized surgical approach tailored according to each patient's severity of facial palsy and associated malpositions resulted in both functional and aesthetic improvements in our patients.
Facial asymmetry correction in facial palsy patients with Silhouette Sutures.
The shingles virus had tracked internally deep into the ear, infecting the facial nerve at the junction of the geniculate ganglion, resulting in the facial palsy.
Five children had paralysis of lower limbs, eleven children had both upper and lower limb involvement, three children had bulbar involvement, two children had facial palsy and mixed palsy was seen among the rest twenty children.