face-lift

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face-lift

 
popular name for rhytidectomy.

rhyt·i·dec·tom·y

(rit'i-dek'tŏ-mē),
Literally, excision of wrinkles. Usually used to designate rejuvenative surgery of the cheeks and neck performed by tightening the facial supporting structures and excising excess skin; face-lift.
[G. rhytis (rhytid-), a wrinkle]

face-lift

also

facelift

(fās′lĭft′)
n.
1. Plastic surgery to remove facial wrinkles, sagging skin, fat deposits, or other visible signs of aging for cosmetic purposes. Also called rhytidectomy.
2. A restyling or modernization, as of a building.
tr.v. face-lifted, face-lifting, face-lifts
To perform a face-lift upon.

rhyt·i·dec·tom·y

(rit'i-dek'tŏ-mē)
Elimination of wrinkles from, or reshaping of, the face by excising any excess skin and tightening the remainder; the so-called face-lift.
Synonym(s): rhytidoplasty.
[G. rhytis (rhytid-), a wrinkle]
References in periodicals archive ?
To us, too, having a face-lift suggests conformity to a norm of glamour and beauty, and refusing one reinforces an essentialist view of woman as locked in "natural," biological determinism.
Thankfully, the combination of being both an artist and a woman offers a way out of the ethical dilemma: most of us are too poor for a face-lift.
Early face-lifts were not so much lifts as simply pulling the skin back.
Harley Street surgeon Basim Matti recalls a 37-year-old woman who had been performing her own mini face-lifts by scraping her hair back and holding it in place all day, thus pulling her skin tight.
HMG director Liz Dale said: "Our male patients are increasingly opting for semi-face lifts - lifting their brows, necks or lower face rather than a full face-lift as they are having the procedure younger.
Often the pressure of a high-powered job and staring at a computer screen for hours on end can be extremely ageing in some people and a face-lift gives them renewed confidence.
I'd often try to pull back the saggy skin with my fingers and imagine what I'd look like with a face-lift, like the women I watched on my favourite plastic surgery makeover shows.
Dr Robert Thayer Sataloff, of the ear, nose and throat department of Philadelphia's Graduate Hospital, said: "There are people who pay pounds 9,000 for a face-lift and as soon as they open their mouth they sound like they're 75.