eyestalk

(redirected from eyestalks)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

eyestalk

(ī′stôk′)
n.
A movable structure in certain crustaceans, such as crabs and shrimp, that bears an eye at the tip.
References in periodicals archive ?
sinensis which included 3,223 proteins and 35,787 interactions based on the transcriptomics sequencing of RNAs in eyestalk, Y-organ and hepatopancreas and the combination of protein-protein interaction information of six models organisms (Hao et al., 2014).
Then carefully hold the female and squeeze the eyestalk of one side with the heated forceps tip.
Initial characterization of a carbonic anhydrase repressor in the eyestalks of the euryhaline green crab, Carcinus maenas.
Key words: Eyestalk ablation, ecdysone induction, hepatopancreas, gene expression
The tissues including hemocytes, muscle, gill, hepatopancreas, nerve cord, cuticle, eyestalk, ovary, testis, vas deferens, and the combined tissues of AG with part of spermatophore sac (AG was distributed scattered and hardly isolated in the Chinese shrimp) were sampled from five females or five males adult individuals and preserved in liquid nitrogen separately for verification of ESTs from the constructed MRT-SSH library.
A possible function of dopamine, as endogenous neurotransmitter, stimulating the secretion of GIH by the sinus gland in the eyestalks has been proposed (Fingerman 1997).
Not only did he successfully convert nature's natural born caravanner into a disco queen, the birds that ate the spangly eyestalks then spread the worm's eggs, included with the free tinsel, in its droppings.
The sinus gland complex present in the eyestalks is the major endocrine center in crustaceans.
Eyestalks stretch, searching nooks and crannies for tidbits of food.
The slug settles in the crab's underside and grows, forming a bulge in its shell and sprouting a set of root-like tendrils that spread throughout the crab's body, even wrapping around its eyestalks. These tendrils draw in nutrients dissolved in the crab's blood.
To protect themselves, they hide in mud or sand with just their eyestalks sticking out.
The shrimp that Van Dover investigated, Rimicaris exoculata, lack normal eyes and eyestalks; hence the name exoculata, which means "without eyes" in Latin.