eyespot


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Related to eyespot: ISPOT, Eye floaters

eye·spot

(ī'spot),
1. A colored spot or plastid (chromatophore) in a unicellular organism.
2. Synonym(s): ocellus (1)

eyespot

(ī′spŏt′)
n.
1. A light-sensitive organelle of certain chiefly unicellular organisms, such as euglenas and some motile algae.
2. A simple visual organ of certain invertebrates, consisting of a cluster of photoreceptor cells and pigment cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results are displayed in Figure 2 and trend towards the finding that those participants exposed to the eyespot treatment were more likely to report feeling anxious, scared, and nervous, compared to the control condition ([M.sub.t] = 2.16, SE = 0.06 > [M.sub.c] = 2.02, SE = 0.06, t(522) = 1.63, p = 0.05, Cohen's d = 0.14, one-tailed).
Kodandaramaiah, "Eyespot evolution: phylogenetic insights from Junonia and related butterfly genera (Nymphalidae: Junoniini)," Evolution and Development, vol.
Eyespots are light-sensitive patches that allow simple organisms, such as jellyfish and some other algae, to sense their environments.
This taxon analoga is the Colombian subspecies (SEITZ, 1916) having minute pupilation in the forewing discal cell eyespot but the hindwing similar to that of phelina.
If data were not being exchanged between the eyespot and the flagellum, then there would be no movement toward sunlight; in turn, there would be no photosynthesis, and then no food storage.
Whereas most video-sharing web sites do not provide an option to download videos, a few hosting services, such as Eyespot, support a download option.
Thus armed with high-quality Eyespot.com video-editing technology and more than 200 movie clips, fans had the means to do what they enjoy right at the home base.
According to this divergence model, one or a few ancestral "eye genes," for example the regulatory gene Pax6, evolved in the ancestral bilateria, resulting in the first eyespot. The ancestral eye then evolved into the various camera-type eyes (probably independently) and various compound eyes.
tritici) and eyespot foot rot [caused by Tapesia yallundae Wallwork and Spooner = Pseudocercosporella herpotrichoides (Fron.) Deighton] in naturally infected fields using visual disease assessment.
These moths also have a white and red, comma-shaped "eyespot" on all four wing segments (see above), as well as light markings on the wings' outer edges, making them look as though they are coated in frost.
Near the tail, they often have an eyespot, creating the impression of a head with antennae.
Eyespot was reported in 53pc of winter wheat and take-all was reported in 41pc of crops.