eyespot


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Related to eyespot: ISPOT, Eye floaters

eye·spot

(ī'spot),
1. A colored spot or plastid (chromatophore) in a unicellular organism.
2. Synonym(s): ocellus (1)

eyespot

(ī′spŏt′)
n.
1. A light-sensitive organelle of certain chiefly unicellular organisms, such as euglenas and some motile algae.
2. A simple visual organ of certain invertebrates, consisting of a cluster of photoreceptor cells and pigment cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results are displayed in Figure 2 and trend towards the finding that those participants exposed to the eyespot treatment were more likely to report feeling anxious, scared, and nervous, compared to the control condition ([M.
Four other types of dinoflagellates-one-celled aquatic organisms that include zooxanthellae-have eyespots, according to Koike.
This taxon analoga is the Colombian subspecies (SEITZ, 1916) having minute pupilation in the forewing discal cell eyespot but the hindwing similar to that of phelina.
Similarly, for a euglena there must be a flow of information between eyespot and flagellum in food acquisition, just as there must be a flow of information between chloroplasts and plastids in food storage.
The caterpillars may resemble bird droppings or have fake eyespots behind their heads.
Through transplantation and damage experiments in Precis coenia, Nijhout (1980) has shown that the cells at the center of a future eyespot pattern, the focus, are responsible for organizing the pattern.
EyeSpot optical store will host a grand opening celebration February 11-13 to debut the opening of its flagship retail store in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts.
A pair of transverse dark brown pigment stripes occur on each anterior segment and there is light pigment on the prostomium surrounding each eyespot region (referred to in this species by Fukuda and Nogueira (2006) as a "mask").
Approximately 15 days after fertilization, settlers have more pronounced pentamerous symmetry, the abactinal and actinal regions become distinct, the dorsal spines become more developed (most numerous in the margins), and the eyespot is fully formed (Fig.
It is thought that the Comet mimics the Whitemouth Moray Eel by day with the head hidden in its coral cavity and with the tail fin eyespot exposed and looking very much like the head, complete with eye, of the predatory eel.
Species of Eurybia are usually large, mostly gray or brown butterflies, usually with an eyespot at the end of the discal cell on the forewing and submarginal spots or occeli along the outer margin on both wings (Hall & Ahrenholz 2010); many species have iridescent scales at least on the hind wing.
The PII region remained very clear, and postlarval organs such as gill buds or filaments, foot, eyespot, and the digestive gland remained intact even after years of preservation.