exudate


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exudate

 [eks´u-dāt]
a fluid with a high content of protein and cellular debris that has escaped from blood vessels and has been deposited in tissues or on tissue surfaces, usually as a result of inflammation.

ex·u·date

(eks'ū-dāt),
Any fluid or semisolid that has exuded out of a tissue or its capillaries, more specifically because of injury or inflammation (for example, peritoneal pus in peritonitis, or the exudate that forms a scab over a skin abrasion) in which case it is characteristically high in protein and white blood cells. Compare: transudate.
Synonym(s): exudation (2)
[L. ex, out, + sudo, to sweat]

exudate

/ex·u·date/ (eks´u-dāt) a fluid with a high content of protein and cellular debris which has escaped from blood vessels and has been deposited in tissues or on tissue surfaces, usually as a result of inflammation.

exudate

[eks′yoo͡dāt]
Etymology: L, exsudare, to sweat out
fluid, cells, or other substances that have been slowly exuded, or discharged, from cells or blood vessels through small pores or breaks in cell membranes. Perspiration, pus, and serum are sometimes identified as exudates.

exudate

Internal medicine A cell and protein-rich fluid that extravasates from the capillaries. See Hard exudate, Pleural exudate, Waxy exudate.

ex·u·date

(eks'yū-dāt)
Any fluid that has exuded out of a tissue or its capillaries because of injury or inflammation.
Compare: transudate
Synonym(s): exudation (2) .
[L. ex, out, + sudo, to sweat]

exudate

1. A protein-rich fluid, such as serum or pus, that has leaked from blood vessels or been discharged by cells or tissues.
2. The accumulation or deposition of such fluid in or on the tissues.

exudate

the material that comes from a cut pore or break in the surface of an organism, such as sweat or cellular debris.

Exudate

The type of pleural effusion that results from inflammation or other disease of the pleura itself. It features cloudy fluid containing cells and proteins.

exudate

any fluid exuded out from a tissue or its capillaries as the result of injury, inflammation or infection

exudate

A liquid or semisolid which has been discharged through the tissues to the surface or into a cavity. Exudates in the retina are opacities that result from the escape of plasma and white blood cells from defective blood vessels. They usually look greyish-white or yellowish and are circular or ovoid in shape. They are sometimes classified into three groups according to size: (1) punctate hard exudates, which often tend to coalesce. They are found in diabetic retinopathy, Coats' disease, etc.; (2) exudates of moderate size, such as 'cotton-wool or soft exudates' as, for example, in branch/central retinal vein occlusion, hypertensive retinopathy, etc. These 'exudates' have ill-defined margins and are actually areas of ischaemia containing cytoid bodies, unlike hard exudates which are generally lipid deposits; (3) larger exudates, as found in the severe forms of retinopathy.

ex·u·date

(eks'yū-dāt)
Any fluid or semisolid that has oozed out of a tissue or its capillaries, more specifically because of injury or inflammation in which case it is characteristically high in protein and white blood cells.
Compare: transudate
Synonym(s): exudation (2) .
[L. ex, out, + sudo, to sweat]

exudate (eks´ōōdāt),

n the outpouring of a fluid substance, such as exudated suppuration or tissue fluid.
exudate, purulent
(eks´ōōdāt pyūr´ələnt),
n pus or suppuration that exudes from the gingival tissues and contains a mixture of enzymes, dead tissue, bacteria, and leukocytes, primarily neutrophils.
exudates, gingival,
n the outpouring of an inflammatory exudate from the gingival tissues.

exudate

a fluid with a high content of protein and cellular debris which has escaped from blood vessels and has been deposited in tissues or on tissue surfaces, usually as a result of inflammation. It may be septic or nonseptic. See also exudative.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value when using pleural fluid cholesterol to differentiate exudate and transudate is higher than the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value when using Light's criteria to differentiate exudate and transudate.
Like Retinal Diabetic, Microaneurysms, Hard Exudates, blood vessels segmentation has been performed accurately using automatic detection by classifier based vessel tracking methods.
It is important to assess some environmental factors that stimulate hyphal growth and sporulation, such as root exudates, and LEDs applied individually and in combination.
Otoscopic examination showed that outer ear canal was thickened and become deformed, ear opening was very narrow and there was presence of black necrotic exudates (Fig.
To conduct the test to find the pH of exudate two temperatures were tested (25 and 30[degrees]C), and three periods of seed imbibition (15, 30 and 45 minutes).
1) In general, Light's criteria correctly identify exudates but may misclassify 20 percent to 25 percent of transudates as exudates.
4) Ophthalmic findings include retinal hemorrhage, macular edema, soft exudates, optic disc edema, vascular sheathing, retinochoroiditis and anterior uveitis.
70 Table 5: Comparison between Light's criteria and new criteria Diagnosis Diagnostic yield (accuracy) Sensitivity Light's New p-Value Light's New criteria criteria criteria criteria Exudate 95% 98% 0.
3) An amylase measurement in pleural fluid higher than that of serum (2) suggests pancreatitis, pancreatic pseudocyst or a ruptured viscus as the cause of the exudate.
2011) in an acidic reaction (ph 4-5), especially in the viscous exudate of Oak and also contained insoluble components composed of cellulose.
The investigators placed elastomeric ON-Q pumps subcutaneously in the incisional wound to permit collection of wound exudate and instillation of agents.