extubate


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ex·tu·bate

(eks'tū-bāt),
To remove a tube.
References in periodicals archive ?
Considering the care management of this patient after the surgery, our goal was to extubate safely and avoid worse bronchospasm.
The aim of these three studies was to tracheally extubate all patients at the same depth of anesthesia using signs of swallowing as a clinical indicator for extubation.
Arguably then, this could offer new and exciting opportunities for recovery practitioners to develop clinically and professionally, especially as intensive care nurses frequently extubate in the ICU without doctors present.
The physician at the bedside who is expecting additional ventricular dysfunction in the immediate post-bypass period would likely factor this finding into the decision to extubate. This delay could result in patients remaining intubated for longer periods of time out of a concern for adding stress on a patient with diminished cardiovascular reserve should extubation fail.
It's very difficult to extubate them because the whole underlying process is inflammation of the vocal cords.
* Daily "sedation vacations" and assessment of readiness to extubate
The neurologist agreed to extubate the patient and transfer her to a medical surgical unit.
I didn't even get to extubate one final patient in a long Kubrick one-shot.
"It also may be better to extubate patients in the late afternoon when their lung function is at its best and breathing on their own is easier."
With proper planning and management, we could extubate patients postoperatively (50.7%) without tracheostomy and its further complications (20).
Ms Thomas said she was asked to help extubate Rohan at 4pm on September 29 - the day after he arrived at the hospital - by Ms Dallorzo.