extrinsic coagulation pathway

ex·trin·sic co·a·gu·la·tion path·way

(eks-trin'zik kō-ag'yŭ-lā'shŭn path'wā)
A part of the coagulation pathway that is activated by contact of factor VII in the blood with tissue factor (TF), an integral membrane protein of extravascular plasma membranes. The integrity of this pathway can be tested by measuring the prothrombin time (PT).
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, adding HES to this fluid severely increased the negative impact on the extrinsic coagulation pathway by increasing hemodilution.
3% HS with 7% vol hemodilution has no significant effect on intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways and impairs fibrinogen--fibrin interaction less than 20% mannitol with 7% vol hemodilution in vitro.
Exposure of the blood to tissue factor triggers the extrinsic coagulation pathway whose function is monitored by the prothrombin time (PT) through interaction of tissue factor with activated coagulation factor.
Exposure of the blood to tissue factor triggers the extrinsic coagulation pathway whose function is monitored by the PT through interaction of tissue factor with activated coagulation factor VII (FVII).
sup][5] These factors could trigger the extrinsic coagulation pathway.
In addition, all patients were screened by several laboratory tests, including measurement of the complete blood count (CBC), including platelet count; prothrombin time (PT) to evaluate the extrinsic coagulation pathway (factor II, V, VII, and X activity), which were converted to calculate the International Normalized Ratio (INR) (7); and activated partial thromboplastin rime (aPTT) to evaluate the intrinsic coagulation pathway (factor VIII, IX, XI, and XII activity).
Ascertainment of PT and INR can detect disturbances of the extrinsic coagulation pathway caused by an intake of oral anticoagulants or secondary to liver disease.
This fibrin clot forms via (1) the intrinsic coagulation pathway, when activated factor XII (FXIIa) binds to the exposed endothelial cells at the site of injury and (2) the extrinsic coagulation pathway, when small amounts of circulating FVIIa bind to tissue factor released from injured endothelial tissues.
The pathogenesis of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation is believed to involve the liberation of thromboplastins produced by the tumor cells, with resultant activation of the extrinsic coagulation pathway.