extrovert

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extrovert

 [ek´stro-vert]
1. a person whose interest is turned outward.
2. to turn one's interest outward to the external world.

ex·tra·vert

(eks'tră-vĕrt), Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation extrovert.
A gregarious person whose chief interests lie outside the self, and who is socially self-confident and involved in the affairs of others. Compare: introvert.
Synonym(s): extrovert

extrovert

/ex·tro·vert/ (eks´tro-vert)
1. a person whose interest is turned outward.
2. to turn one's interest outward to the external world.

extrovert

also

extravert

(ĕk′strə-vûrt′)
n.
An extroverted person.

extrovert

[ik′strəvurt′]
1 a person whose interests are directed away from the self and concerned primarily with external reality and the physical environment rather than with inner feelings and thoughts. This person is usually highly sociable, outgoing, impulsive, and emotionally expressive.
2 a person characterized by extroversion. Also spelled extravert. Compare introvert.

ex·tro·vert

(eks'trŏ-vĕrt)
A gregarious person whose chief interests lie outside the self, and who is socially self confident and involved in the affairs of others.
Synonym(s): extravert
Compare: introvert
References in periodicals archive ?
Extraverts engage in more interpersonal citizenship when motivated to impression manage: Getting along to get ahead?
In the 1960s the psychologist Hans Eysenck found out about a major differentiatior between introverts and extraverts, that being the high stimulation extraverts need from the world in order to feel energetic, whereas introverts are much more easily inward stimulated and therefore more inclined into loneliness and quietness.
Introverts won't show or discuss their work before they themselves are satisfied, while most extraverts share instinctively.
For the extravert the object is valuable and fascinating he related to the outside world typically open sociable and active.
No significant differences in linguistic accuracy existed between extraverts and introverts.
This finding suggested that trainers should use active experimentation/activity based learning for extraverts to use in a group, but at the same time provide time and instances to reflect such as case studies or scenario planning activities to introverts.
These findings were in line with a previous study that showed that neurotic extraverts but not individuals with low neuroticism and high extraversion have difficulty disengaging from positive signals (Derryberry & Reed, 1994).
For instance, Furnham (1992) found that extraverts tend to be more active, whereas introverts are more reflective.
Grant was surprised to find that people on the two ends of the spectrum - extreme introverts and extreme extraverts - brought in relatively equal amounts of revenue.
First, Jung (1971) posited that there are two types of people, introverts and extraverts.
78) From this perspective, extraverts are gregarious.
Extraverts favoured confident, seductive, shapely and well-groomed targets; highly agreeable people targets who smiled; conscientious people those who appeared formal and conventional; stable participants "classy," well-groomed and smiling targets and those who scored high on openness, trendy, and thin.