extraverted personality

ex·tra·vert·ed per·son·al·i·ty

(eks'tră-vĕrt-ĕd per'sŏn-al'i-tē)
A persona that is more involved with external phenomena than with introspection.
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Our findings on extraversion fit with past research on other casual sex relationships (e.g., hookups; (Olmstead et al., 2013) in that those who identified having a more extraverted personality were also more likely to have a FWBR during the semester.
Hypothesis 1: Compared to familiarized mass tourists, organized mass tourists will exhibit more extraverted personality traits.
Hypothesis 3: Compared to familiarized mass tourists, independent tourists will display more extraverted personality traits.
Men and women were different in terms of introverted and extraverted personality type.
(1997), may be due to the optimistic nature of the extraverted personality. What is important for the counselor, however, is to recognize that individuals with more introverted personalities may be at risk for exercise relapse, due to their lower exercise self-efficacy.
Of particular importance in a sales management context are whether a sales manager has been a successful salesperson and possesses an extraverted personality. After all, if a sales manager has been an effective salesperson and has an extraverted personality, these two personal features conceivably will define the way in which he or she views both the managerial and selling role, as well as determine how he or she interacts with sales subordinates.
Extraverted Personality. Extraverts tend to prefer opportunities to meet many people and be people oriented (Bass, 1990).
There was, though, a lower level of agreement (mean scores are below 5 on a 7-point scale) that sales managers should have been successful salespersons, have an extraverted personality, or continue to sell to large accounts.
This group does not strongly believe, though, that sales managers should have been successful salespersons, have an extraverted personality, or continue to sell to large accounts.
The remaining three role orientation dimensions-having been a successful salesperson, having an extraverted personality, and continuing to sell to large accounts-are perceived to be of lesser concern to this group of sales managers.
The perceptions of the other four role orientation dimensions-communication skills, having been a successful salesperson, having an extraverted personality, and continuing to personally sell to a few accounts-evidently are not affected by sales manager level.