extrasystole

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extrasystole

 [ek″strah-sis´to-le]
a premature cardiac contraction that is independent of the normal rhythm and arises in response to an impulse outside the sinoatrial node.
atrial extrasystole one in which the stimulus is thought to arise in the atrium elsewhere than at the sinoatrial node.
atrioventricular extrasystole one in which the stimulus is thought to arise in the atrioventricular node.
interpolated extrasystole a contraction taking place between two normal heartbeats.
nodal extrasystole atrioventricular extrasystole.
retrograde extrasystole a premature ventricular contraction followed by a premature atrial contraction, due to transmission of the stimulus backward, usually over the bundle of His.
ventricular extrasystole one in which either a pacemaker or a re-entry site is in the ventricular structure.

ex·tra·sys·to·le

(eks'tră-sis'tō-lē),
A nonspecific word for an ectopic beat from any source in the heart.

extrasystole

(ĕk′strə-sĭs′tə-lē)
n.
A premature contraction of the heart, resulting in momentary cardiac arrhythmia.

ex′tra·sys·tol′ic (-sĭ-stŏl′ĭk) adj.

ex·tra·sys·to·le

(eks'tră-sis'tŏ-lē)
An ectopic beat from any source in the heart.
Synonym(s): premature systole.

extrasystole

A premature contraction of the heart. This is usually followed by a pause longer than the normal interval between heart beats and this is often perceptible to the subject. Extrasystoles are often described as palpitations. Ventricular extrasystoles are often described as VENTRICULAR ECTOPY.

ex·tra·sys·to·le

(eks'tră-sis'tŏ-lē)
A nonspecific word for an ectopic beat from any source in the heart.
References in periodicals archive ?
The extrasystoles method is, theoretically, not restricted to a certain breathing pattern or lung compliance, but we do expect that the method has other limitations described for dynamic variables such as cardiac function and tamponade, so the coverage estimates presented here should be regarded as a maximal potential of the extrasystolic method.
Regarding comparison of the clinical covariates that influence extrasystolic coverage, the selected cohort appeared reasonably representative of the remaining population diagnosed with sepsis in the matched clinical database (n = 429).
As a final limitation to our study, sepsis criteria have been updated [20] during our data analyses and it is unknown if this would affect our extrasystolic coverage estimates.
Overall, we believe that our systematic approach to detection, the final common classification along with strong agreement in the interrater reliability analysis, has resulted in a very reliable estimate of the real extrasystolic coverage in the selected cohort.