extrapolate

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extrapolate

(ĕks″tră′pō-lāt″)
To infer a point between two given, or known, points on a graph or progression. Thus, if an infant weighed 20 lb at a certain age and 4 months later weighed 23 lb, it could be inferred that at a point halfway between the two time periods, the infant might have weighed 21.5 lb.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence, the test data that was extrapolation in the original experimental feature space of Figure 2 is not an extrapolation in the artificially generated MVV feature space of Figure 4.
In some cases, regulatory agencies may come to different decisions in allowing extrapolation of indications for a given biosimilar.
Direct costs analysis plus at least some estimation of any isolation costs may be a starting point, while those looking to employ an assay which has already had a detailed published economic analysis may find an extrapolation approach fruitful.
But he also stressed that "extrapolation should be done with caution and not routinely granted."
Steel steps into the void of neglect given to the logic of extrapolation by putting forward a well-designed theory to explain how it can be successfully done.
Wall losses are minimized by the use of "low-temperature Fomblin," and the notoriously difficult extrapolation from storage lifetimes to [[tau].sub.n] is made more reliable by the novel use of an accordion-like storage vessel.
The extrapolation is straightforward in the case shown in Fig.
But the economists who do the forecasting rely mostly on an extrapolation of past production trends, and mechanically infer that because the world's farmers were able to sustain rapid growth in the world grain harvest from 1960 to 1990, they will continue to do so ad infinitum.
One recognizes the basis of these extrapolations in contemporary developments.
Small sample sizes, reporting and "harmonizing" biases (respondents and panel members knew the purpose of the study), extraordinary extrapolations from small bases, and arbitrary overhead and opportunity cost allocations all contribute to a lack of objective confidence in the relative values reported.
Extrapolations from high temperatures to lower temperatures can lead to invalid estimates of oxidation rates.
For some, the main frustration was the limited ability of current toxicologic test batteries to assess subtle forms of toxicity that may occur at low doses; for others, the main source of frustration was the sense that extrapolations across dose and species leads to overly cautious standard setting.