extrapolate

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extrapolate

(ĕks″tră′pō-lāt″)
To infer a point between two given, or known, points on a graph or progression. Thus, if an infant weighed 20 lb at a certain age and 4 months later weighed 23 lb, it could be inferred that at a point halfway between the two time periods, the infant might have weighed 21.5 lb.
References in periodicals archive ?
Extrapolating from small local networks, the scalefree model indicates that a few well-connected master routers direct Internet traffic to numerous, less essential routers in the network's periphery.
The authors' survey of the existing evidence and their methods for extrapolating conclusions from that body of work showcase the need for further research, which they recommend "should focus on those health outcomes and topics for which reduced uncertainty or different values could lead to different policy options."
By extrapolating that number to the entire sky, Alejo Martinez-Sansigre of the University of Oxford in England and his collaborators came up with the predicted number of quasars in the cosmos.
Extrapolating from their laboratory tests, the researchers theorize that simply walking into a patient's room can dislodge spores that cling to visitors' clothing.
What may be in question, however, is the enterprise of extrapolating from the infinitesimal, quark-scale realm of QCD to the experimentally measurable traits and behaviors of much larger particles, such as protons, neutrons, and mesons.
Clearly, the controversies that surround dose-response relationships, selection of appropriate models for extrapolating human responses to environmental insult, and the factors that are responsible for interindividual variations in susceptibility to adverse health effects can only be addressed if we make appropriate use of new technologies and our exploding knowledge of fundamental biologic processes.
Extrapolating their findings to the rest of the country, the researchers say that prior to the folic acid-fortification rule, an average of 4,130 neural tube defects occurred each year.
Although food-use pesticide registrations require developmental toxicity studies and generational reproduction studies that are used to evaluate potential pre- and postnatal toxicity, extrapolating from animal bioassays is not a perfect method.