extraneous

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ex·tra·ne·ous

(eks-trā'nē-ŭs),
Outside of the organism and not belonging to it.
[L. extraneus]

extraneous

(ĕks-trā′nē-ŭs) [L. extraneus, external]
Outside and unrelated to an organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
the movement has gone far beyond politics [...] it's situated in a dimension defined by radical extraneousness and refusal.
The violent reactions of the police, killing on the spot bandits caught in the act, and images of bandit corpses diffused by newspapers and television represented them as living in a permanent state of exception, where being killed without any legal judgement was an ever-present possibility, inherent in their condition of extraneousness. This had, of course, connotative implications for all the inhabitants--strangers or nationals--of the quartiers criminogenes.
Subsection (b)(3) of the Byrd rule provides an exception to the definition of extraneousness on the basis of committee jurisdiction for certain provisions reported by a committee, if they would be referred to that committee upon introduction as a separate measure.
The majority of the 'classics' of modern times, from Baudelaire to Kafka, from Tolstoy to Svevo, are 'scandalous' even today: one cannot teach them without trying to convey the shock of their extraneousness from the modern world and its culture.
As in Dizdar's film, the modification of the traditional masculine social role in films of the early eighties actually provided a golden opportunity to demonstrate the extraneousness of Woman within the bourgeois home, that the father was quite capable of handling the job of socializing the young.
The extraneousness of their vehicles does not distract the reader's attention from the poems' main thread of discourse for more than a moment.
The essence of man's alienation in the contemporary world is perceived by John Paul II in the fact that man feels his extraneousness in relation to God and people, and in this sense negates his nature (2).
Garber and Zuckerman claim, on the other hand, that the 'extraneousness' of the term and the vagueness of its biblical origins have undoubtedly helped make it acceptable and less prone to overuse among the many people who are unaware of its connotations.