extraneous tissue

extraneous tissue

See Floater, surgical pathology.
References in periodicals archive ?
An extraneous tissue contaminant on a slide is called a floater.
The animals were maintained for a period of 4 days, sacrificed on the fifth day and the implanted rexin pellets infiltrated with granuloma were removed, cleared of extraneous tissue and dried in a hot air oven to constant weight.
Vom Saal and Myers suggested that prostate weights were very large in our control mice (Tyl et al 2008), in his view, likely due to prostatitis and/or poor dissection techniques resulting in extraneous tissue left on the prostates.
Not infrequently, the presence of extraneous tissue (ET), also known as floaters or pickups, on a slide may lead to diagnostic uncertainty.
When discrepancies in fragment number were identified by the pathologist on the glass slide, an effort was made to exclude insufficient sectioning depth and inadvertent "pickup" of extraneous tissue by examination of the paraffin block and/or production of additional slides with deeper levels from the block.
Afterward, they were purified from extraneous tissues. Preparations were fixed by loops of a thin thread on the vertical axis of the vessel and the nodes that had been used to attach the preparations to the camera's hook and mechanatronic's rod.
The animals were anaesthetized on the 8th day and cotton pellets were removed surgically and made free from extraneous tissues. The pellets were incubated at 37 [degrees]C for 24 hrs and dried at 60 [degrees]C to constant weight.
Seven days after treatment, the uteri were removed from these animals, stripped of extraneous tissues, weighed, and chilled in ice-cold saline before analysis.