environment

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environment

 [en-vi´ron-ment]
the aggregate of surrounding conditions or influences on an individual.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

en·vi·ron·ment

(en-vī'rŏn-ment),
The milieu; the aggregate of all of the external conditions and influences affecting the life and development of an organism. It can be divided into physical, biologic, social, cultural; any or all of which can influence the health status of the population.
[Fr. environ, around]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

environment

(ĕn-vī′rən-mənt, -vī′ərn-)
n.
a. The totality of the natural world, often excluding humans: "Technology, of course, lies at the heart of man's relationship with the environment" (Mark Hertsgaard).
b. A subset of the natural world; an ecosystem: the coastal environment.
c. The combination of external physical conditions that affect and influence the growth, development, behavior, and survival of organisms: "Conditions in a lion's environment ... can drive it to hunt people" (Philip Caputo).
d. The complex of social and cultural conditions affecting the nature of an individual person or community.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

en·vi·ron·ment

(en-vī'rŏn-mĕnt)
The milieu; the aggregate of all of the external conditions and influences affecting the life and development of an organism.
[Fr. environ, around]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

environment

the surroundings of any organism, including the MEDIUM, SUBSTRATE, climatic conditions, other organisms (see BIOTIC FACTORS), light and pH.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

en·vi·ron·ment

(en-vī'rŏn-mĕnt)
The milieu; aggregate of all external conditions and influences affecting life and development of an organism.
[Fr. environ, around]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about environment

Q. what environment is recommended for one who has Asthma?

A. dry and clean. as less pollens, dust, pollution - the better is for the asthmatic. any allergen in the environment would cause attacks. (as long as he is allergic..)

Q. i feel huge tension when i am in close narrow environment , is it a phobia?

A. Yes, it may be considered a phobia, or more specifically situational type phobia. However, the important thing is whether is this fear reasonable? Do you think it's out of proportion? Phobia is a fear that one perceive as irrational and out of proportion and yet one feels and is affected adversely by it. If this fear is appropriate (e.g. fear of falling in mountain climbing) it's not a phobia.

You may read more about it http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/phobias.html

Q. how exactly dust effects on asthmatic people? how can one avoid a dust environment?

A. some people try to dust proof there home,they change there matress once a year-----thay do not have rugs in there home---no curtains or draps --and they have someone else dust and clean/no pets.some people keep there pets and take allergie meds.

More discussions about environment
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References in periodicals archive ?
An interesting observation from some of the studies referred above is the fact that certain bacterial proteins, predicted cytoplasmic by consensus, can be found in the extracellular environment of the cell, where they may play alternative functions.
Another feature revealed in the chronic stress groups was the phenomenon of partial degranulation (mast cell activation), as described in previous studies [42, 43], in which the content of granules is only partially released in the extracellular environment.
These ultra-thin protein 'package' the haemoglobin molecules and protect them from exposure to the hostile extracellular environment, while allowing them to transport oxygen and carbon dioxide.
Scientists base such studies on the knowledge that these drugs can manipulate the extracellular environment, expanding constricted vessels in the brain or preventing a toxic concentration of calcium ions from entering neurons.
By coupling the bulk gel with a small peptide derived from the extracellular environment of genuine stem cell niches, and mixing it with a tissue-specific stem cell type as well as the porogen, the team can create a boneforming artificial niche.
"Creating a nanofiber network that enables us to more equally distribute cells and more closely mirror the actual cartilage extracellular environment are important advances in our work and in the field.
There are alternative explanations to the selective release of gene transcripts, however, including an insensitivity of the RT-PCR method to detect very low mRNA concentrations, or differences in mRNA stability in the extracellular environment.
This work is unique because EC-SOD is almost exclusively located in the extracellular environment and thus allows examination of the role of extracellular ROS in SCI.