coaptation

(redirected from external coaptation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Legal.

co·ap·ta·tion

(kō'ap-tā'shŭn),
Joining or fitting together of two surfaces; for example, the lips of a wound or the ends of a broken bone.
[L. co-apto, pp. -aptatus, to fit together]

coaptation

/co·ap·ta·tion/ (ko-ap-ta´shun) the process of approximating, or joining together.

co·ap·ta·tion

(kō'ap-tā'shŭn)
Joining or fitting together of two surfaces; e.g., the lips of a wound or the ends of a broken bone.
[L. co-apto, pp. -aptatus, to fit together]

co·ap·ta·tion

(kō'ap-tā'shŭn)
Joining or fitting together of two surfaces; e.g., the lips of a wound or the ends of a broken bone.
[L. co-apto, pp. -aptatus, to fit together]

coaptation (kō´aptā´shən),

n the bringing together of two parts so as to create a seamless alignment.

coaptation

having been coapted.

external coaptation
for fractures by the use of external appliances, e.g. various splints, and casts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prognosis for recovery was poor because of several factors: the contraindication for internal fixation based on thin femoral cortices with subjectively poor radiodensity on radiographs, a lack of documented techniques for external coaptation of bilateral femoral fractures, and concerns regarding the ability to adequately maintain the bird during a long convalescent period.
In this report, we describe an external coaptation device that allowed for the nonsurgical stabilization of bilateral pathologic femoral fractures in an egg-laying conure.
5) For minimally displaced fractures of the ulna when the radius is intact, external coaptation with a figure-8 bandage could be a less complex and less costly method of management entailing minimal iatrogenic trauma to the soft tissue.
Radioulnar synostosis can occur both as a postoperative complication or when external coaptation is used as the sole form of stabilization.
In this case, excessive motion at the fracture site, resulting from the inability of the external coaptation to maintain fragment stability, resulted in delayed union.
The rigidity of minimally invasive percutaneous osteosynthesis is considerably superior to that of external coaptation, approaching the rigidity of plates with some constructs.
Perching-joint angles on straight lateral views can be used as a guideline for external coaptation or for presurgical planning.

Full browser ?