external chest compression

external chest compression

Emergency medicine A technique of basic life support, consisting of serial, rhythmic applications of pressure on the lower half of the sternum, which provides circulation to the heart, lungs, brain, and other organs with a general ↑ in intrathoracic pressure and/or direct compression of the heart
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under these circumstances, rescue ventilation and external chest compression are the cornerstones of successful therapy and should be initiated and continued until signs of life are evident either in the patient or professional emergency personnel are able to diagnose continued asystole on a cardiac monitor/defibrillator.
As a result, expeditious defibrillation is required, followed by or, if necessary preceded by, effective external chest compressions, whichever is appropriate.
Standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (S-CPR) refers to the entire body of techniques of external chest compression and securing positive pressure ventilation for the purpose of achieving adequate blood and oxygen flow into vital organs such as the heart and brain following cardiac arrest (1).
A history of mechanical devices for providing external chest compressions. Resuscitation 2007; 73: 330-6.
To do external chest compression properly, kneel beside the victim's chest.
External chest compressions provide artificial circulation.
The 2005 CPR Guidelines emphasized the importance of high-quality external chest compressions (ECCs) with an adequate rate and depth that allowed for complete chest recoil post-individual compression while minimizing interruptions (2).

Full browser ?