exteriorize


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Related to exteriorize: monophasia

exteriorize

 [eks-te´re-er-īz]
1. to form a correct mental reference of the image of an object seen.
2. in psychiatry, to turn one's interest outward.
3. to transpose an internal organ to the exterior of the body.

ex·te·ri·or·ize

(eks-tēr'ē-ōr-īz),
1. To direct a patient's interests, thoughts, or feelings into a channel leading outside the self, to some definite aim or object.
2. To expose an organ temporarily for observation, or permanently for purposes of experiment.
3. Fixation of a segment of bowel with blood supply intact to the outer aspect of the abdominal wall.

exteriorize

/ex·te·ri·or·ize/ (ek-stēr´e-ah-rīz)
1. to form a correct mental reference of the image of an object seen.
2. in psychiatry, to turn one's interest outward.
3. to transpose an internal organ to the exterior of the body.

exteriorize

(ĭk-stîr′ē-ə-rīz′)
tr.v. exterior·ized, exterior·izing, exterior·izes
Medicine To expose (an internal organ or body part), as in surgery.

ex·te·ri·or·ize

(eks-tēr'ē-ōr-īz)
1. To direct interests, thoughts, or feelings into a channel leading outside the self, to some definite aim or object.
2. To expose an organ temporarily for observation, or permanently for purposes of physiologic experiment.
Synonym(s): exteriorise.

exteriorize

to transpose an internal organ to the exterior of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sun exteriorizes itself, becoming radiant, and so instructs the eye to see.
I argue that Bunuel exteriorizes the male psyche and its double in the form of a female character's image split into two opposites, portrayed by two different actresses.
In effect, punctuation just exteriorizes and marks by visual means the syntactic, semantic and discursive relationships between the words.
These categories are very useful and are convincing in the form in which they are presented: Lope exteriorizes on stage the mental processes or the dreams of characters, develops the plot, stages a 'show' scene where spectacle is paramount, or integrates all these types of staging.
One of Seltzer's contentions is that there is, now, a rupture of the private into the public in the spectacle of the publicized pornography of serial killing and in the literalness of mutilation which exteriorizes that which had been interior.
Humanity, as Rahner puts it in Sacramentum Mundi (1968), is "the possible mode of existence of God if God exteriorizes Himself to what is other than himself; man is the potential brother of Christ.
His suggestion that a Christian view of the body as that which both exteriorizes our will and resists it, as harbor of both sin and redemption, can serve as a basis for forming subjects who can understand illness and healing eschatologically is creative and intriguing.
melodrama exteriorizes conflict and psychic structure' (35).