exteriorize

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Related to exteriorisation: externalise

exteriorize

 [eks-te´re-er-īz]
1. to form a correct mental reference of the image of an object seen.
2. in psychiatry, to turn one's interest outward.
3. to transpose an internal organ to the exterior of the body.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ex·te·ri·or·ize

(eks-tēr'ē-ōr-īz),
1. To direct a patient's interests, thoughts, or feelings into a channel leading outside the self, to some definite aim or object.
2. To expose an organ temporarily for observation, or permanently for purposes of experiment.
3. Fixation of a segment of bowel with blood supply intact to the outer aspect of the abdominal wall.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

exteriorize

(ĭk-stîr′ē-ə-rīz′)
tr.v. exterior·ized, exterior·izing, exterior·izes
Medicine To expose (an internal organ or body part), as in surgery.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ex·te·ri·or·ize

(eks-tēr'ē-ōr-īz)
1. To direct interests, thoughts, or feelings into a channel leading outside the self, to some definite aim or object.
2. To expose an organ temporarily for observation, or permanently for purposes of physiologic experiment.
Synonym(s): exteriorise.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
One can readily see how this reading of individuation as potential for reinterpretation would confirm Hansen's suspicion that Stiegler, as with other thinkers of 'technesis', simply reduces the technical, through interpretation, to the exteriorisation of thought.
In such an ex-propriation of technics from humanity, beyond even the exteriorisation of man, subject, and consciousness in mnemo-technical repositories seen so far, Heidegger's notion of 'ek-sistence' would seem to harbour the possibility of at last thinking technics per se, externally of any recuperative consciousness, alongside a more originary disclosure of Being.
Patients undergoing re-laparotomy for anastomotic leakage should have exteriorisation of the leak site done.
Resection of the affected segment of ileum, with exteriorisation of ends in the first stage and reversal of the stoma with ileo-ileal anastomosis in the second stage, constituted our most frequently performed procedure.
That is to say, it's not language but first of all exteriorisation and interiorisation: of the phantasm of the transitional object.
On apercoit par la avec une certaine precision en quoi Proust depasse la litterature toute contemporaine dont il prend connaissance et rend compte dans ses lettres: les souvenirs litteraires qu'il retient comme operatoires pour sa propre entreprise passeront par un agrandissement et par une exteriorisation.
(11.) Yet again one has to be careful not to assume something prior, a something, which gets supplemented through a process of prosthetic exteriorisation: 'A "prosthesis" does not supplement something, does not replace what would have been there before it and would have been lost', since a prosthesis, 'is not a mere extension of the human body; it is the constitution of this body qua "human"', ibid., p152-3.
This 'tertiary' layer of retention exists as material culture into which we are born, into a world not of our own making so to speak, though as the exteriorisation and spatialisation of individual time becoming collective time, 'tertiary retention is an original exteriorization of mind' (FNC, p9).
(25) 'Prostheticity' and the related terms 'prosthetic' and 'prosthesis' are allimportant for Stiegler, which he uses to describe the 'exteriorisation' of the organism through the use of tools.
(10) Hypomnemata, external memory devices, must be understood in their radical nature: as Stiegler points out, no 'interiority' precedes the externalisation/grammatisation process; rather, 'exteriorisation constitutes the interior as such' (AH): hypomnemata form the very basis of philosophical and thus of political culture; the fact that they are pharmaka means that they can consist of technologies of knowledge and intelligence--of enlightened political engagement and culture-building--or technologies of stupidity short-circuiting any positive cultural development.
(11) Human culture is the product of technics as the prosthetic relationship between the human and its 'exteriorisation' in matter.