extended-spectrum beta-lactamase


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extended-spectrum beta-lactamase

Third generation cephalosporinase Microbiology A beta-lactamase produced by gram-negative enteric bacteria, in particular K pneumoniae and E coli, which are resistant to third-generation cephalosporins. See Third-generation cephalosporin.

extended-spectrum beta-lactamase

Abbreviation: ESBL
Any enzyme that makes bacteria (esp. gram-negative bacteria such as the Enterobacteriaceae) resistant to the effects of broad-spectrum beta-lactam antibiotics.
See also: beta-lactamase
References in periodicals archive ?
Risk factors associated with the community-acquired colonization of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) positive Escherichia Coli.
Molecular and phenotypic characterization of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases with focus on CTX-M in a low-endemic area in Sweden.
Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases are most often produced by Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp., which are members of Enterobacteriaceae family [7,8].
Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases in the 21st century: characterization, epidemiology, and detection of this important resistance threat.
The newly discovered enzymes became known as extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, or ES[beta]Ls.
They are distinct from extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) by their ability to hydrolyse cephamycins and they are not affected by b-lactamase inhibitors.2 In the Ambler structural classification of b-lactamases, AmpC enzymes belong to class C, while in the functional classification scheme of Bush these are assigned to group 3.3
Countrywide spread of community and hospital-acquired extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (CTX-M-15)-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Lebanon.
Mulvey, "Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase resistance," Canadian Antimicrobial Resistance Alliance (CARA), pp.
Rapid dissemination and diversity of CTX-M extended-spectrum beta-lactamase genes in commensal Escherichia coli isolates from healthy children from low-resource settings in Latin America.
Escherichia coli emerges as an agent in 70-95% of community-acquired urinary tract infections andin 50% of hospital-acquired cases.1 The most important and common cause of resistance to beta- lactam antibiotics preferred to treat these infections is the production of beta-lactamase and especially extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL).
Identification of CTX-M-14 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase in clinical isolates of Shigella sonnei, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Korea.

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