exsanguination


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exsanguination

 [eks-sang″gwĭ-na´shun]
extensive blood loss due to internal or external hemorrhage.

ex·san·gui·na·tion

(ek-sang'gwi-nā'shŭn),
Removal of blood; making exsanguine.

exsanguination

Trauma surgery A condition that is “…the most extreme form of hemorrhage, with an initial blood loss of > 40% and ongoing bleeding which, if not surgically controlled, will lead to death.” See Salvage surgery–trauma, Staged surgery.

ex·san·gui·na·tion

(ek-sang'gwi-nā'shŭn)
Removal of blood; making exsanguine.

exsanguination

The loss of a substantial proportion, or almost the whole volume, of the blood. The result of a severe haemorrhage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Arterial blood samples (10 ml) were collected from abdominal aorta before exsanguinations. After allowing sufficient time for clotting, the samples were centrifuged at 2500 x g for 15 min.
Following anesthesia and collection of blood and exsanguinations, macrobeads were randomly selected for histopathology.
Managing exsanguination: what we know about damage control/bailout is not enough.
A pseudoaneurysm may progress to rupture with exsanguination and limb loss.
The cause of death was ruled as blunt impact of the torso and abdomen, resulting in exsanguination and respiratory arrest.
In another experiment, after the collection of blood, the bilateral lungs were weighed immediately after exsanguination and dried in an oven at 95[degrees]C for 48 hr.
Mortality rate was 25%; four patients died from exsanguination within 9 hours [2].
Postmortem examinations and complete histologic evaluations were performed on two affected sheep (cases 1 and 2) following euthanasia with intravenous (IV) sodium pentobarbital and exsanguination. Tissue samples, including different parts of the tumors, regional lymph nodes and sun-exposed skin, were fixed in 4% buffered formaldehyde, processed routinely, and 5 [micro]m sections were cut and stained with Mayer's hematoxylin and eosin (HE) for histology.
In the operating room, opening of the peritoneal cavity sometimes releases this pressure, leading to massive exsanguination and death.
Prompt control of hemorrhage is imperative as exsanguination is the most common cause of death.
The mice were euthanized by halothane inhalation and the diaphragm, with its phrenic nerve branch, was dissected; animal death was confirmed by exsanguination.