exsanguination

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exsanguination

 [eks-sang″gwĭ-na´shun]
extensive blood loss due to internal or external hemorrhage.

ex·san·gui·na·tion

(ek-sang'gwi-nā'shŭn),
Removal of blood; making exsanguine.

exsanguination

Trauma surgery A condition that is “…the most extreme form of hemorrhage, with an initial blood loss of > 40% and ongoing bleeding which, if not surgically controlled, will lead to death.” See Salvage surgery–trauma, Staged surgery.

ex·san·gui·na·tion

(ek-sang'gwi-nā'shŭn)
Removal of blood; making exsanguine.

exsanguination

The loss of a substantial proportion, or almost the whole volume, of the blood. The result of a severe haemorrhage.
References in periodicals archive ?
His in-human act of consuming the flesh and blood of a dead, exsanguinated nonhuman serves, then, as an ironic rehearsal for the vampire's unhuman act of exsanguinating and consuming the flesh of an undead human.
Army Medical Department, Medical Research and Materiel Command, since mid-World War II, nearly 50 percent of combat deaths have been due to exsanguinating hemorrhage (bleeding out).
This enables local infection of adjacent graft material with resultant disruption of the vascular anastomosis and exsanguinating hemorrhage [3].
Two patients died after gunshots to the head and 1 from exsanguinating haemorrhage after an injury to the femoral artery in the thigh.
Tokyo, July 22, 2013 - (ACN Newswire) - Severe damage to the large vessels from multiple trauma or accidental complications in surgery can cause exsanguinating hemorrhage leading to death.
OHK Medical is located in the same city, and is concerned with the development and manufacture of self-contained, sterile, and exsanguinating tourniquets for hospitals.
(7,30) Surgical resection, therefore, requires careful identification and dissection of the systemic arterial supply and venous drainage of the BPS malformation in order to avoid the exsanguinating hemorrhage.
Damage control: an approach for improved survival in exsanguinating penetrating abdominal injury.
"Damage Control": An approach for improved survival in exsanguinating penetrating abdominal injury.
Or the policeman who had been shot at point-blank range in the throat, and was in the process of exsanguinating until I blindly stuck an endotracheal tube down his throat and inflated the cuff.
It is rather surprising, therefore, that surgeons appear to have been diffident, in those early exciting days of pioneering abdominal operations, to open the abdomen of the exsanguinating patient and remove the lacerated spleen.