exquisite

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ex·qui·site

(eks-kwiz'it),
Extremely intense, keen, sharp; said of pain or tenderness in a part.
[L. exquiro, pp. exquisitus, to search out]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ex·qui·site

(eks-kwiz'it)
Extremely intense, keen, sharp; said of pain or tenderness.
[L. exquiro, pp. exquisitus, to search out]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ex·qui·site

(eks-kwiz'it)
Extremely intense, sharp; said of pain in a part.
[L. exquiro, pp. exquisitus, to search out]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
No doubt the exquisite beauty of the buildings I saw was the outcome of the last surgings of the now purposeless energy of mankind before it settled down into perfect harmony with the conditions under which it lived--the flourish of that triumph which began the last great peace.
"I shall ask our Physiological Lecturer why he never gave us that exquisite Theory!"
Suppose a young lady has just been warbling ('with a grating and uncertain sound') Shelley's exquisite lyric 'I arise from dreams of thee': how much nicer it would be, instead of your having to say "Oh, thank you, thank you!" for the young lady herself to remark, as she draws on her gloves, while the impassioned words 'Oh, press it to thine own, or it will break at last!' are still ringing in your ears, "--but she wouldn't do it, you know.
Hop-Frog, who, although he made a great deal of sport, was by no means popular, had it not in his power to render Trippetta many services; but she, on account of her grace and exquisite beauty (although a dwarf), was universally admired and petted; so she possessed much influence; and never failed to use it, whenever she could, for the benefit of Hop-Frog.
Miss Wilkinson told him stories of the exquisite delicacy of Frenchmen when they stood in the same relation to fair ladies as he to Miss Wilkinson.
Her tone, as she uttered the exclamation, had a plaintive and really exquisite melody thrilling through it, yet without subduing a certain something which an obtuse auditor might still have mistaken for asperity.
She crouched on the floor like a wounded thing, and Dorian Gray, with his beautiful eyes, looked down at her, and his chiselled lips curled in exquisite disdain.