censorship

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censorship

 [sen´ser-ship]
the action of the censor.

censorship

(sĕn′sər-shĭp′)
n.
Psychology Prevention of disturbing or painful thoughts or feelings from reaching consciousness except in a disguised form.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore there would have been ways of avoiding disclosure of the source of the leak that would not have required the release of an expurgated version of the document.
In a perfect world, someone will edit and publish these intertwined expurgated tales.
The show's script, penned by television writers Jaime Browne and Kris Mrksa in consultation with a dozen of Kennedy's friends and former associates, is strong yet feels curiously expurgated, particularly when it comes to the later parts of Kennedy's life.
Alibech's tale was expurgated from the Decameron, and the nun did public penance.
His desire for total control over bibliographical information even led him to urge that catalogues from the Frankfurt book fair should be banned or at least expurgated. Printers were not to use lascivious illustrations such as ornamental capital letters depicting naked women.
Fortunately, Walter expurgated the original lyric somewhat.
This is precisely the conservatism that has been, in more recent years, eclipsed or expurgated, yet one that has much to say about our situation as it alters in a postmodern setting presided over by self-acclaimed geometricians and enlighteners impervious to the deeper metaphysical needs of civilization, and of the human personality and soul.
At one point, for instance, Montgomery notes that Nora has been "poking fun" at her for reading an "expurgated edition" of George Eliot's Adam Bede.
Sylvester, Lord Riddell and Maurice Hankey, instead of relying on expurgated published versions.
In three central chapters which focus on the novelistic practices of Samuel Richardson, Ann Radcliffe, and George Eliot, Price aligns the anthology with its disreputable cousins--the abridgment, the expurgated edition, the bowdlerization--in order to show how these little-studied forms exerted an influence on reading in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
Ann Thompson and Sasha Roberts report that in the course of the eighteenth century, women had more opportunities to attend performances of and to read Shakespeare's plays, but by the early nineteenth century, women were encouraged to read expurgated editions to protect them from Shakespeare's profanity and obscenity or forbidden to read Shakespeare altogether (1-2).