exposure-prone

exposure-prone

adjective Referring to a risk of contact with an adverse effect–eg malpractice liability, hazardous substance–eg, cyanide in environment, or pathogen–eg, HIV or HBV in a body fluid
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20 Recommendations for preventing transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and Hepatitis B virus to patients during exposure-prone invasive procedures.
Like 2012 and 2015 editions, this year's Rating the States uses a 100-point scale to assess the progress of 18 hurricane exposure-prone states along the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coast in strengthening their residential building code systems.
Transmission of BBVs is associated with exposure-prone invasive procedures (EPPs) (Table 1), inadequate infection control precautions and drug diversion by HCPs who abuse injection drugs, and determined by the circulating viral burden.
According to Australia's national guidelines, a health professional positive with HIV can continue to work as long as he or she does not perform exposure-prone procedures.
In August 2013, the Chief Medical Officer for England announced a change in policy to remove restrictions on Healthcare Workers (HCW) with HIV practising Exposure-Prone Procedures (EPPs).
Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from an infected health-care worker to patients is rare (1), with the greatest potential for occurrence during exposure-prone, invasive surgical procedures in which the blood of the healthcare worker might come into contact with patients' blood or mucous membranes.
The Fitness for Practice panel learned that he had ignored Government guidelines issued in 2002 banning health workers with hepatitis C from carrying out exposure-prone procedures where blood from the worker could get into the patients' tissues.
Exposure-prone procedures are those invasive procedures where there is a risk that injury to the worker may result in the exposure of the patient's open tissues to the blood of their health care worker.
For these and other exposure-prone employees, clubs must meet the following four conditions.
In the abstract, one easily could argue that this legal framework prohibits all or almost all discrimination against HIV-infected health care providers because of the absence of a "direct threat." The risks presented by HIV-infected health care workers would not be considered significant because of the extremely low probability of HIV transmission even in the most exposure-prone procedures.(86) This analysis is consistent with the EEOC's interpretive guidelines, which suggest that a risk is significant only when there is a high probability of substantial harm; speculative or remote risks must not be used to justify discrimination.(87)
A spokeswoman said: "This person never worked in the operating theatre of the hospital and was only present at a small number of exposure-prone procedures, all of which are in the low-risk category.
The appendices reprint crucial materials pertaining to HIV: the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for preventing HIV transmission in health care settings, their recommendations on HIV-infected health care workers performing exposure-prone medical and surgical procedures, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's workplace safety rule on blood-borne pathogens.