exposure


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exposure

 [eks-po´zhur]
1. the act of laying open, as surgical exposure.
2. the condition of being subjected to something, as to infectious agents or extremes of weather or radiation, which may have a harmful effect.
3. in radiology, a measure of the amount of ionizing radiation at the surface of the irradiated object, such as a person's body; calculated by multiplying milliamperage times exposure time in seconds, expressed in units of milliampere seconds (mAs). See also x-rays.
x-ray exposure see exposure (def. 3).

ex·po·sure

(eks-pō'zhūr),
1. A condition of displaying, revealing, exhibiting, or making accessible.
2. In dentistry, loss of hard tooth structure covering the dental pulp due to caries, dental instrumentation, or trauma.
3. Proximity or contact with a source of a disease agent in such a manner that effective transmission of the agent or harmful effects of the agent may occur.
4. The amount of a factor to which a group or individual was exposed; in contrast to the dosage, the amount that enters or interacts with the organism.
Epidemiology A state of contact or close proximity to a chemical, pathogen, radioisotope or other other substance by ingesting, breathing, or direct contact—e.g., on skin or eyes; exposure may be short term—acute—or long term—chronic

Imaging An image, such as an anteroposterior exposure of the chest
Medical liability The degree of malpractice risk borne by a health care provider while performing a particular medical service
Nuclear physics The amount of ionising radiation in air from X-rays or gamma rays at a specific point in space, defined as the total charge of ions divided by the mass that would completely stop the radiation; the SI unit for exposure is coulomb per kg—C/kg; in human terms, exposure refers to the amount of ionizing radiation to which a person has been subjected

exposure

Epidemiology A state of contact or close proximity to a chemical, pathogen, radioisotope or other other substance by swallowing, breathing, or direct contact–eg, on skin or eyes; exposure may be short term–acute or long term–chronic. See Acute exposure, Athlete exposure, Chronic exposure, Intermediate exposure, Occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens, Perinatal substance exposure Imaging An image, as an AP exposure of the chest Medical liability A general term for the degree of malpractice risk borne by a health care provider while performing a particular medical service See Risk management.

ex·po·sure

(eks-pō'zhŭr)
1. Contact of a compound with an epithelial barrier such as the skin, eyes, respiratory tract, or gastrointestinal tract before absorption occurs.
See also: exposed dose, external dose
2. Physical effects caused by harsh weather.
3. Placing an object or person in a given environmental state.

exposure

  1. the aspect of a particular location with respect to the points of the compass, for example, some garden plants, such as the peach tree in England, prefer a southern exposure.
  2. a rock outcrop.
  3. a soil section.

ex·po·sure

(eks-pō'zhŭr)
1. In dentistry, loss of hard tooth structure covering the dental pulp due to caries, dental instrumentation, or trauma.
2. A condition of displaying, revealing, exhibiting, or making accessible.
3. Proximity to contact with a source of a disease agent in such a manner that effective transmission of the agent or harmful effects of the agent may occur.

Patient discussion about exposure

Q. I feel some effects due to less exposure to sunlight. I heard that UV lighting is effective for depression. I’m living in northwest pacific; the summers are very nice but way to short. I feel some effects due to less exposure to sunlight. I have been told that sun light helps the production of the chemical in the brain that we are deficient of. If true, are there certain types of fixtures and/or bulbs that I should try.

A. Its also called seasonal affective disorder:
http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/disorder

(SAD) depression with fatigue, lethargy, oversleeping, overeating, and carbohydrate craving recurring cyclically during specific seasons, most commonly the winter months.

I would about UV. Perhaps you should get a fluorescent light fixture for the area where you spend the most time each day and turn it on.

The web sites that sell the commercial light boxes want several hundred dollars or even more. (Seems like rip off to me.)
The web page at
http://www.ncpamd.com/seasonal.htm

says "studies suggest that regular fluorescent lights will work as well. UV (ultraviolet) light can damage eyes and skin, so it must be filtered out. It is best to buy a commercially built light box to be sure of the exact amount of light and to be sure that there are no isolated "hot spots" which could damage eyes. Many people still prefer full spectrum (minus UV) light because it i

Q. how do i keep my baby as minimal as passable exposed to the out side world threats? like decease and other things

A. It might seem like a caring attitude, but I'm not sure it's neither possible nor absolutely necessary - babies do get sick, usually only mildly and transiently, so trying to prevent all the cases of fever would be quite impossible.

What you can do, is to maintain the regular infant welfare visits, give him or her the necessary vaccinations (one of the most important things you can do for your child), make sure your baby eats well, regarding both the amount and type of foods, and generally keep a good hygiene: make sure to wash hands after you go to the toilet and before you handle your baby, don't expose him or her to other sick infants etc.

However, all this is just a general advice - if you have specific question you may want to consult your doctor (e.g. a pediatrician).

Take care,

More discussions about exposure
References in periodicals archive ?
For companies hedging forecasted exposures and electing hedge accounting, the principal challenge was to ensure that derivatives could be matched to a pool of exposures with similar time horizons.
Inhalation exposure to soluble hexavalent chromium can lead to nasal irritation, nasal ulcerations and perforations, asthma and bronchitis.
The new outlook described in the strategic plan involves an increased emphasis and sharpened focus on understanding how environmental exposures affect human biology, and on applying that knowledge to reduce morbidity and mortality.
reached a verdict in favor of the defendants, rejecting the plaintiff's argument that exposure to welding fumes caused Parkinson's disease.
Except for these special cases, exposure to mold has not been shown to be a pervasive health problem for the population in general.
According to the guidelines, the most important action in a case of potential exposure to B virus is to rapidly and thoroughly cleanse the wound or exposure site.
* Exposure limits - eight-hour time-weighted average (TWA) permissible exposure limit (PEL of 1 part BD per million parts air [ppm]); short-term exposure limit (STEL) of 5 ppm over a 15-minute period; and an action level of 0.5 ppm.
According to OSHA standard 1910.1030 for bloodborne pathogens, as of March 1, 1992 all employees with job descriptions that include primary responsibilities that could involve possible exposure to blood or other potentially infectious substances (camp nurses, lifeguards, first aiders, tripping staff, off-season program leaders, maintenance staff charged with waste clean-up, etc.) must be offered HBV vaccination, at no cost to the employee, within 10 working days of their initial placement in that position.
The Bloodborne Pathogens Act provides a safer and healthier work environment for those individuals in danger of this type of exposure. Public safety agencies that have not already done so should familiarize themselves with the legislation and act immediately to institute its various mandates.
As mentioned, an appropriate benchmark for determining this amount is the amount that it would cost to fully hedge the exposure. This is because, as noted, an unrelated distributor that received a discount equivalent to the hedging cost through its inventory purchase price would be willing to accept the foreign exchange risk, since it could nullify that risk at no additional expense.
A number of thoughtful critical comments directed at Statement 96 have been incorporated by the Board in the Exposure Draft.