expose

(redirected from exposing)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

ex·pose

(eks-pōz'),
To perform or undergo exposure.
[O. Fr. exposer, fr. L. ex-pono, pp. ex-positum, to set out, expose]

expose

1. To open, as in surgically opening the abdominal cavity.
2. To cause someone or something to lack heat or shelter.
3. To place in contact with an infected person or agent.
4. To display one's genitals publicly, esp. when members of the opposite sex are present.
5. To deliver an amount of radiation.

ex·pose

(eks-pōz')
To perform or undergo exposure.
[O. Fr. exposer, fr. L. ex-pono, pp. ex-positum, to set out, expose]
References in periodicals archive ?
Later, a 1995 TNA cover story article warning against an alternative "Conference of the States" became the main educational tool exposing that approach to a con-con, and the April 2, 1995 Salt Lake Tribune credited the Society with the victory: "In a span of just weeks, the John Birch Society has heaved the conference locomotive off track." (For more information about the Birch campaign to protect the Constitution, see page 29.)
Another option is to locate the geniculate ganglion by exposing the greater superficial petrosal nerve.
In doing so, they unknowingly exploded rockets containing chemical agents, possibly exposing themselves and other troops to low levels of those agents.
Besides exposing the condom to other unfavorable conditions, reuse would prolong its exposure to ozone.
IRBs should assume that intentionally exposing human subjects to even small doses of pesticides may produce serious or irreversible effects, unless the researchers produce evidence to the contrary.
When exposing pregnant mice to 100 mg/kg BPA given subcutaneously, BPA was detected 30 min after exposure in fetal sera, liver, brain uterus, and testes (Domoradzki et al.
The researchers were able to make the sensitive mice tolerate the endotoxins by repeatedly exposing them to the toxins.
A reasonable attitude is that studies involving informed and consenting volunteers, who are exposed to controlled low doses of the agents in question and carefully monitored for ill effects, are more ethically acceptable than exposing whole populations without the reassurance provided by this information.