exponent


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exponent

(ĕks′pō-nĕnt)
In mathematics, the number that indicates the power to which another number is to be raised. It is written as a superscript (e.g., 102 or x2 indicates that 10 and x are to be squared, or multiplied by themselves). The exponent can have any numerical value and may be positive or negative; it does not have to be a whole number.

exponent

a number or quantity placed as a superscript to the right of another number or quantity, indicating how many times the number is to be multiplied by itself. For example, 106.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first calculation performed was the Hurst Exponent for the Saudi Basic Industries return from 09/21/2005 to 09/21/2010.
Lyapunov exponent, as an important exponent to test the property of chaotic map, is widely used in the world of chaos.
(2004) modeled the daily returns series of the PSI-20 using a formulation of fBm and determined the Hurst exponent by DFA from 1993 to 2001.
The values of scaling exponent in temperature anomaly records are significantly higher than those in precipitation.
From Figures 3 and 4, we can see that the Lyapunov exponents of Figure 3 are less than 0 or tend to be 0, while in Figure 4, there is one exponent that is greater than 200 with no tendency to 0.
Exponent Philanthropy said in the statement that its Pulse Check surveys are internal yardsticks it uses to gauge membership opinions on important and timely topics.
The Hurst exponent can be understood as a scaling relation for statistically self-similar data [15].
Exponent offers a foundation for carriers to fuel their digital transformation and compete with a range of new digital service providers by expanding their Big Data and Artificial Intelligence, Internet of Things (IoT), Media Services and Internet Services Delivery platforms.
The top Lyapunov exponent of the nonlinear system is evaluated by Wolf's algorithm to determine whether the chaotic phenomenon of the nonlinear system actually occurs.
A number of algorithms can be employed to estimate the power exponent values, including the least squares method (LSM), maximum-likelihood method (MLM), and major axis method (MAM).
The theory of function spaces with variable exponent was extensively studied by researchers since the work of Kovacik and Rakosnik [6] appeared in 1991; see [7,8] and the references therein.