explant

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explant

 
1. (eks-plant´) to take from the body and place in an artificial medium for growth.
2. (eks´plant) tissue taken from the body and grown in an artificial medium.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ex·plant

(eks-plant'),
Living tissue transferred from an organism to an artificial medium for culture.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

explant

(ĕk-splănt′)
tr.v. ex·planted, ex·planting, ex·plants
To remove (living tissue) from the natural site of growth and place in a medium for culture.
n. (ĕks′plănt′)
Explanted tissue.

ex′plan·ta′tion n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

explant

Transplantation medicine An organ that requires removal due to rejection, after transplantation. See Transplantation.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ex·plant

(eks-plant')
Living tissue transferred from an organism to an artificial medium for culture.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

explant

any actively dividing plant tissue that can be induced to produce CALLUS tissue in tissue culture.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Every decision, whether as simple as selecting lunch or as complex as considering kidney explantation, is the net or end product of numerous motivations, only one of which is the pure commercial motivation associated with an economistic worldview.
And he attacked the French government for urging 30,000 women to have surgery, "Why pay for women's explantations where there is a real surgery risk?
At the time of his June 1, 2002, deposition, he had performed 143 "explantations" on patients who returned with complaints.