population

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population

 [pop″u-la´shun]
1. the individuals collectively constituting a certain category or inhabiting a specified geographic area.
2. in genetics, a stable group of randomly interbreeding individuals.
3. in statistics, a theoretical concept used to describe an entire group or collection of units, finite or infinite; from it a sample can be drawn.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pop·u·la·tion

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn),
Statistical term denoting all the objects, events, or subjects in a particular class. Compare: sample.
[L. populus, a people, nation]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

population

(pŏp′yə-lā′shən)
n.
1.
a. All of the people inhabiting a specified area.
b. The total number of such people.
2. The total number of inhabitants constituting a particular race, class, or group in a specified area.
3. The act or process of furnishing with inhabitants.
4. Ecology All the organisms that constitute a specific group or occur in a specified habitat.
5. Statistics The set of individuals, items, or data from which a statistical sample is taken. Also called universe.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

population

EBM
A collection of subjects from which a sample is drawn for a study to obtain estimates for values that would be obtained if the entire population was studied.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

population

Clinical research Universe A group of persons to be described or about which one wishes to generalize, assuming that the group is representative of an entire population. See Control population, Patient population Global village The aggregate of persons in a specified area. See Zero population growth.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pop·u·la·tion

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn)
Statistical term denoting all the objects, events, or subjects in a particular class.
Compare: sample (1)
[L. populus, a people, nation]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

population

  1. the total number of the individuals of a particular species, race or form of animal or plant, inhabiting a particular locality or region.
  2. (in genetics) the total number of BREEDING INDIVIDUALS of a species in a particular location.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

pop·u·la·tion

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn)
Statistical term denoting all the objects, events, or subjects in a class.
[L. populus, a people, nation]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The greedy choice strategy is introduced in this step to compare the fitness value of all the individuals in the experimental population T and the population P; then the individuals [T.sub.i] with the larger fitness value in the experimental population T are assigned to [P.sub.i] to accomplish the update.
The Secretary of the Interior may create two categories of experimental populations under section 10(j): essential and nonessential.(92) This designation is made on a case-by-case basis.(93) An essential experimental population is one whose loss the Secretary has determined "would be likely to appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival of that species in the wild."(94) Anything else is designated as nonessential.(95) This distinction between essential and nonessential experimental populations was designed to promote and facilitate reintroduction efforts and to further the ESA's overriding goal of conservation.
Selection and the r/K continuum in experimental populations of protozoa.
The overall mean weekly mortality rate for the two experimental populations calculated across the 34-wk period was significantly different (P [less than] 0.001) between logged and primary forest sites (([lambda]) [plus or minus] 1 SD; SM, 0.227 [plus or minus] 0.067; GP, 0.144 [plus or minus] 0.041; Tables 2 and 3).
I randomly selected 64 plants in the experimental population to be tagged in 1994.
I searched for effects of the experimental manipulation by comparing population variables from the May-October monthly censuses of the experimental populations with those of the control populations during 1992.
In early June 1991, one half-sib greenhouse cultivated female and one directly transplanted "neighborhood" female from each healthy population was planted into each of 60, circular, randomly placed stations in each experimental population. From the experimental population, one female derived from seeds and one directly transplanted female were also planted to each station, giving a total of eight plants (3 + 3 + 2) per station.
Seventeen Freshwater Mollusks In an effort to restore populations of a number of endangered Alabama freshwater mollusks, we designated nonessential experimental population status on June 14 for reintroduced populations of 16 mussels and one aquatic snail in the Tennessee River below Wilson Dam.
However, there have been no published attempts to directly test hypotheses about ecological factors that may alter the shape of male gain curves by manipulating conditions in experimental populations. Such experiments might be difficult in terrestrial plant or marine fish systems (which have received the most empirical attention) due to the problems inherent in manipulating wind, insect pollinators, and fish behavior.
This DPS will retain the status of endangered; the nonessential experimental population designation ill Arizona, New Mexico, and a small portion of Texas, remains unchanged.
For the experimental population in this study, germplasm was combined from three gene subpools.

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