expense

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ex·pense

(eks-pens')
That which is given in exchange for something else; cost.
[L. expendo, to pay out]
References in classic literature ?
As to the line of separation between external and internal taxes, this would leave to the States, at a rough computation, the command of two thirds of the resources of the community to defray from a tenth to a twentieth part of its expenses; and to the Union, one third of the resources of the community, to defray from nine tenths to nineteen twentieths of its expenses.
"It rests with you," he proceeded, "when you hear what I have to tell you, to say whether you will go to the expense of sending a man to New York, or not.
People in Europe desiring to join the excursion--contagious sickness to be avoided--boating at the expense of the ship--physician on board--the circuit of the globe to be made if the passengers unanimously desired it--the company to be rigidly selected by a pitiless "Committee on Applications"--the vessel to be as rigidly selected by as pitiless a "Committee on Selecting Steamer." Human nature could not withstand these bewildering temptations.
"What is the expense of cutting your reflections short, Mr.
And extremely acceptable it is, for we must live at a great expense while we are here."
It was my earnest wish to help him to prepare to enter Hampton, and to save money to assist him in his expenses there.
"In point of fact," resumed Sir James, not choosing to dwell on "fits," "Brooke doesn't mean badly by his tenants or any one else, but he has got that way of paring and clipping at expenses."
Asked why, he said he supposed it was on the ground of expense. This being met by a remark that Mr.
How needless the expense! To prove to you that we already know all about it, I inclose herewith a list and description of all the ships you have."
Now as this law, under a modified form, is to this day in force in England; and as it offers in various respects a strange anomaly touching the general law of Fast and Loose-Fish, it is here treated of in a separate chapter, on the same courteous principle that prompts the English railways to be at the expense of a separate car, specially reserved for the accommodation of royalty.
Here is Uncle Silas, all these years a preacher--at his own expense; all these years doing good with all his might and every way he can think of--at his own expense, all the time; always been loved by everybody, and respected; always been peaceable and minding his own business, the very last man in this whole deestrict to touch a person, and everybody knows it.
The great lords, and even the Emperor himself, maintain their tables with no great expense. The vessels they make use of are black earthenware, which, the older it is, they set a greater value on.