expenditure

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ex·pen·di·ture

(eks-pen'di-chŭr)
The act of expending; an amount expended or used up.
[L. ex-pendo, to weigh out, pay]
References in periodicals archive ?
This requirement is tempered in that an entity making alterations to a primary function area need only expend up to 20% of the overall alteration costs on complying with the path of travel requirement.
Worker ants seem to expend considerable effort sorting and consolidating the brood.
Nevertheless, the Service does not want to have to expend the resources to issue summonses to attorneys who fail to file complete Forms 8300 identifying the payors.
'We used to expend two hours from Tarkwa to Damang, but the story is different now.
Their crews were under orders to expend their ordnance only in support of RESCAP operations in case one of the aircraft was shot down.
He urged that to fulfill the protocols and requirements of international buyers Industry and research institution should work together and a liaison is must to expend exports sector.
He referred that both countries had agreed to expend bilateral trade volume up to 90 million USD in upcoming decade.
This study, presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress (CCC) 2018 in Toronto, investigated how many breaks, and for what duration, are needed to expend 770 kilocalorie (kcal).
The terms of the MOU would see Metal Tiger pay for the ongoing licence renewal fees and other maintenance costs for a minimum of 12 months (estimated to be approximately USD 100,000 p.a.) and up to a maximum of three years within which timeframe Metal Tiger is to expend a total of USD 800,000 on project costs (including licence renewal fees) and an agreed exploration work program, to maintain its 50% interest in the JV.
Under the agreed terms, AEM will expend 5 million [euro] within three years of the commencement date to earn a 51% interest in the Hanhimaa gold project.
Business would need to expend resources to familiarize themselves with yet another regulation of their hiring practices and, eventually, the case law that develops around the new statute.
Were this the only argument for their adoption, it would be far better to expend the same effort toward increasing metal-producing facilities.