expansiveness


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Related to expansiveness: Pressured speech

ex·pan·sive·ness

(ek-span'siv-nes),
A state of optimism, loquacity, and reactivity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gender plays a big part in these expectations which then have to shift a great deal if gender expansiveness or a different gender identity is revealed.
The expansiveness of Mormon principles can be seen as "an achievement of something that is valued in the culture,'' Herrin said.
The programme for this Thursday night concert was a thundering trio of works which also had common musical connections - energy, force, expansiveness and excitement, and, despite the disparate nationalities of their composers, a distinctly American feel.
A Hollow Hole Of Riches is a fine example of Scottish indie rock and hints at the kind of expansiveness that Idlewild never quite managed.
A Hollow Hole Of Riches is a fine example of Scottish indie rock - alternative and quirky, boasting sing-along choruses hinting at the kind of expansiveness Idlewild never quite managed.
Yet the expansiveness of that palette is also littered not only with abundant internal creative traps, but also external ones: The show's road could be complicated by running afoul of faith-based groups who are easily riled by mainstream entertainment--or, conversely, be so mindful about not offending as to lobotomize those areas that make the pilot so intriguing.
An England team accused of pedestrianism under Hodgson during a qualification campaign which had yielded no wins against their main group rivals, the hosts discovered new-found expansiveness with Tottenham's Townsend at the fore.
A marked contrast with the expansiveness of the vista once you have squeezed yourself free at the top.
One study manipulated the expansiveness of workspaces in the lab and tested whether "incidentally" expanded bodies (shaped organically by one's environment) led to more dishonesty on a test.
By his own admission, Sherman admits that the expansiveness of the subject leaves many spectators at his presentations feeling "a bit fire-hosed," wishing they had had more time to digest the information.
Mapping musical form onto literal architecture is a subtle and effective conceit of the script, as when Beak and the camera gaze up at vaulted ceilings of' San Antonio de los Alemancs, "founded in 1606 by Philip Ill in Victoria's lifetime," to convey the controlled expansiveness of Victoria's settings of the Offices for Holy Week.
Kapphahn credits her parents for such expansiveness.