expanded disability status scale


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expanded disability status scale (EDSS),

a commonly used rating system for evaluating the degree of neurologic impairment in multiple sclerosis, based on neurologic findings, and not symptoms; there are 10 grades in all, in steps and half-steps (for example, 4, 4.5, 5), with "1" being neurologically normal and "10" being death.

ex·pand·ed dis·a·bil·i·ty sta·tus scale

(EDSS) (eks-pand'ĕd dis'ă-bil'i-tē stat'us skāl)
A commonly used rating system for evaluating the degree of neurologic impairment in multiple sclerosis, based on neurologic findings, and not symptoms; there are 10 grades in all, in steps and half-steps (e.g., 4, 4.5, 5), with "1" neurologically normal and "10" dead.
Synonym(s): Kurtzke multiple sclerosis disability scale.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kurtzke, "Rating neurologic impairment in multiple sclerosis: an expanded disability status scale (EDSS)," Neurology, vol.
Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS): The EDSS is the standard measure of disease progression and the degree of neurological impairment in clinical practice and clinical trials.
Dirucotide did meet certain secondary endpoints related to the progression of the disease, including mean change from baseline in the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) score.
In recent years, QOL has been used along with scales that measure the severity of MS (for example, the Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] developed by Kurtzke in 1983) as a partner for measuring the subjective and functional effects of the neurological impairments, the disability, and handicap aspects.
The "gold standard" for measuring MS disease progression is the relatively insensitive Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) (7).
Miller and colleagues (1998) suggested several reasons for the lack of strong correlation between results of conventional MRI finding and level of functional disability, including problems with measurement error in quantifying MRI parameters; difficulty quantifying relapses; and the non-linearity of the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), a commonly used scale that measures both impairment and disability (Kurtzke, 1983).
Data was evaluated in two subgroups: patients with low levels of disability (expanded disability status scale score of less than or equal to 2) and patients with early-stage disease (duration of less than or equal to 2 years).
In the past 6 years, 75% of them experienced no confirmed progression of their MS, and 10% improved, as measured by a scale called the Expanded Disability Status Scale (or EDSS).
The participants filled in the Expanded Disability Status Scale, a sociodemographic form, and a dyadic adjustment scale.
The preliminary study on 226 patients with MS revealed that the DYMUS is a valid and reliable scale for the early detection of dysphagia with a significant positive correlation between the scale and Kurtzke's Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score (7).
In a new exploratory analysis from the extended control period of the Phase III ORATORIO study in PPMS, OCREVUS may significantly delay the time to need a wheelchair by seven years, as measured by the length of time until a person reaches Expanded Disability Status Scale seven or greater using 24-week confirmed disability progression, or CDP.
Additionally, a recent article in Multiple Sclerosis Journal noted that the quality of life for a person with MS with severe disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale >7), as measured by EQ-5D mean utility scores, ranks among the worst for chronic conditions.2 Although treatments are available for RMS, the most common form of MS at diagnosis, people with PPMS in Australia have not had an approved disease-modifying treatment until now.

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