exophoric


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ex·o·phor·ic

(ek'sō-fōr'ik),
Relating to exophoria.

ex·o·phor·ic

(eks'ō-fōr'ik)
Relating to exophoria.
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Halliday states that exophoric reference means that the identity presumed by the reference item is recoverable from the environment of the text.
The texts were analyzed in terms of anaphoric, cataphoric, and exophoric references, as well as theme and rheme progressions, topic types, genre, and lexical density.
1995; Emmott, 1997; Rong, 2011; Sidner, 1983) followed in this study, suggest that the explicit mention of a referent in surrounding co-text is not the key to implicit subject identification, as the referent is not in the text, nor in an exophoric context, but in the cooperatively built mental representation of the state of affairs in speakers' and hearer's minds.
However, exophoric relations play no part in textual cohesion.
In informal registers, for example, simple nouns are often used to name things and pronouns to establish endophoric (within-text) or exophoric (outside-text) references; whereas in more formal registers, nouns of varying complexities--particularly technical nouns, abstract nouns, and expanded noun groups--are often used to construe technicality, generalisation, agency, and density.
Purcell-Gates (2001) explains that oral language can have exophoric external references to meanings outside of the text but written language must have endophoric or within-text references.
The cataphoric and exophoric use of the historical we highlights the limitations of the ingroup and creates a contrast with its subsequent use in the speech.
Tiriyo and Lavukaleve have what seem at first glance to be rather similar three-term demonstrative systems for exophoric deixis, with a proximal term, a distal term, and a middle term.
In this short story, the referent of the situationally exophoric "it" is usually the operation which "isn't really an operation at all" and is never specified beyond the ambiguous description of "let[ting] the air in" (SS 275).
Furthermore, it seems that whatever exophoric reference in low-level interlanguage there is takes the form of well-established collocational items such as the Third World and an eye for the unknown.