exogenous pyrogens

ex·og·e·nous py·ro·gens

drugs or substances that are formed by microorganisms and induce fever. Among the latter are lipopolysaccharides and lipoteichoic acid.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ex·og·e·nous py·ro·gens

(eks-oj'ĕ-nŭs pī'rō-jenz)
Drugs or substances that are formed by microorganisms and induce fever. Among the latter are lipopolysaccharides and lipoteichoic acid.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ex·og·e·nous py·ro·gens

(eks-oj'ĕ-nŭs pī'rō-jenz)
Drugs or substances that are formed by microorganisms and induce fever.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Substances originating outside the body that cause a fever are called "exogenous pyrogens." One class of well-known and well-characterized exogenous pyrogens is the class of endotoxins.
Infectious fever is the defensive and adaptive reaction that occurs when an organism's immune system comes into contact with exogenous pyrogens, or pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP).
Bacterial products, such as LPS (exogenous pyrogens) stimulate leukocytes to release cytokines such as IL-1 and TNF (called endogenous pyrogens) that increase the enzymes (cyclooxygenases) that convert AA into prostaglandins.
Fever production in response to exogenous pyrogens is believed to be mediated mostly by cytokine prostaglandin pathways, and neural input is important in the early phases of fever (9).
All these test systems are based upon the response of human leukocytes (principally monocytes), which release inflammatory mediators (endogenous pyrogens) in response to pyrogenic contamination (exogenous pyrogens).