exoenzyme


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Related to exoenzyme: extracellular enzyme

exoenzyme

 [ek″so-en´zīm]
an enzyme that acts outside the cell that secretes it.

ex·tra·cel·lu·lar en·zyme

an enzyme performing its functions outside a cell, for example, the various digestive enzymes.
Synonym(s): exoenzyme

exoenzyme

(ĕk′sō-ĕn′zīm′)
n.
An enzyme, such as a digestive enzyme, that functions outside the cell from which it originates.

ex·tra·cel·lu·lar en·zyme

(eks'tră-sel'yŭ-lăr en'zīm)
An enzyme performing its functions outside a cell (e.g., the various digestive enzymes).
Synonym(s): exoenzyme.

exoenzyme

An enzyme that operates outside the cell in which it was formed.
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References in periodicals archive ?
aeruginosa produces a number of virulence factors which help in invasion and damage to host tissues.16 The expression of most of these virulence factors are regulated by two component transcriptional regulatory system and quorum sensing which are essential for the survival and growth of bacteria in the host.4 The most crucial virulence factors are alginate, elastase, exotoxin A, phospholipase and exoenzyme S which are regulated through proper signalling mechanisms.17 When the bacteria are high in number, P.
However, further studies are necessary to understand the role of individual bacteria and the exoenzymes in bloom regulation.
Accumulation of Mycelium Biomass andProteolytic Exoenzymes
ADP-Ribosylation and Subcellular Redistribution of Rac1 by Exoenzyme S.
VPA1327 encoding an exoenzyme T revealed 64% (over 233 amino acids) and 46% (over 173 amino acids) with exoenzyme T of Providencia alcalifaciens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively.
A variety of genes are under the quorum sensing control regulon many of which modulate bacterial virulence including genes involved in exoenzyme production and biofilm formation [15-17].
(6) Other virulence factors can cause pulmonary damage by different mechanisms such as Exoenzyme S, Exotoxin A, Elastase and Phospholipases.
Exoenzyme S (ExoS) is a bifunctional protein secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa via the bacterial type III secretory (TTS) process.
Recently it has been shown that various other autoinducer molecules regulate the production of exoenzyme virulence determinants in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Erwinia carotovora (Jones et al., 1993).
The exoenzymes: alkaline protease [12], elastase [13], exotoxin A, exoenzyme S and hemolysin are produced during the course of clinical infection and contribute for the development of infections in animal models [10,11,14].
albicans many virulence factors, such as germ tube formation, exoenzyme production, and phenotypic switching (10).
ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON A PROTEASE EXOENZYME PRODUCED BY A HALOPHILIC BACTERIUM ISOLATED FROM AN INLAND SALT SPRING.