exocrine


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

exocrine

 [ek´so-krin]
1. secreting externally via a duct.
2. denoting such a gland or its secretion.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ex·o·crine

(ek'sō-krin),
1. Denoting glandular secretion delivered onto the body surface. Synonym(s): eccrine (1)
2. Denoting a gland that secretes outwardly through excretory ducts.
[exo- + G. krinō, to separate]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

exocrine

(ĕk′sə-krĭn, -krēn, -krīn′)
adj.
1. Secreting externally, directly or through a duct: exocrine cells.
2. Relating to or produced by an exocrine gland.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

exocrine

adjective Referring to a gland with a duct through which its secretions pass—e.g., lacrimal gland, salivary gland.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ex·o·crine

(ek'sō-krin)
1. Denoting glandular secretion delivered to an apical or luminal surface.
Synonym(s): eccrine (1) .
2. Denoting a gland that secretes outwardly through excretory ducts.
[exo- + G. krinō, to separate]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Exocrine

Relating to external secretion glands, such as sweat glands or salivary glands that release a secretion through a duct to the surface of an organ.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ex·o·crine

(ek'sō-krin)
1. Denoting glandular secretion delivered onto the body surface.
2. Denoting a gland that secretes outwardly through excretory ducts.
[exo- + G. krinō, to separate]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
"It was then confirmed that she had exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.
(19), which evaluated exocrine function of pancreas in diabetics with poor glycemic control, PS was not correlated with fecal elastase-1 levels.
(5) A number of laboratory tests are available to measure exocrine functions either directly or indirectly.
[26] further found that mRNA and proteins of TR[alpha]1 and TR[beta]1 were detected in islets, while no expression was found in the exocrine pancreas.
For fecal elastase levels, a new cut-off level demonstrating normal pancreas exocrine function should be determined.
Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and laboratory tests (faecal fat index > 10% and faecal elastase activity < 200 [micro]g/g).
Davoli, "Giant mediastinal mature teratoma with increased exocrine pancreatic activity presenting in a young woman: A case report," Journal of Medical Case Reports, vol.
Incidence, demographics, and clinical characteristics of diabetes of the exocrine pancreas (type 3c): A retrospective cohort study.
The diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary tumors on trucut biopsies and excision biopsies poses a great difficulty for the pathologist, as due to their similarity with other endocrine and exocrine pancreatic tumors including pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, Pancreatoblastoma and acinar cell carcinomas.
Our results indicate that the pancreas is divided into two sections: the exocrine and endocrine portion.The exocrine portionis comprised of peripheral gland cells and centroacinar cells; the endocrine portion consists of islet cells.
The rise in blood glucose stimulates the endocrine part of the pancreas to produce insulin (as opposed to the exocrine part which is responsible for digestive enzymes).