existential


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ex·is·ten·tial

(ek'si-sten'shăl),
Pertaining to a branch of philosophy, existentialism, concerned with the search for the meaning of one's own existence, that has been extended into existential psychotherapy.
[L. existentia, existence]

existential

(ĕg′zĭ-stĕn′shəl, ĕk′sĭ-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or dealing with existence.
2. Based on experience; empirical.
3. Of or as conceived by existentialism or existentialists: an existential moment of choice.
4. Linguistics Of or relating to a construction or part of a construction that indicates existence, as the words there is in the sentence There is a cat on the mat.
n. Linguistics
An existential word or construction.

ex′is·ten′tial·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a representative German sample (N = 603), 61% of participants were classified as experiencing meaningfulness, 35% as experiencing existential indifference, and 4% as having a crisis of meaning.
Those who wrote about their own deaths and had taken the placebo and were suffering from nonpalliated existential discomfort set the bail amount at $500, about 40% higher.
The problem of 'bleakness' is existential in nature.
The existential perspective on human nature emphasizes individual freedom to choose one's values and meaning in life.
Within this book, along and between the lines one discovers the essay to think about illness as one of the living being's modes of being, or, more precisely as an existential, presupposes an entire ontology, a kind of fundamental ontology which is similar to the one carried out by Martin Heidegger.
It reaches forward to what he describes as the explicitly existential milieu of films like Maidstone and Wild go which loose their participants into a situation without a script or normative ground and record them composing a world together from a series of unpremeditated responses to shifts and alignments of force.
The education of coexistence as techne tou biou refers to the postmodern education (4) not only because of communicative aspects but also because of ironic approach that presupposes the plurality of the existential regions.
In Chapter 4 Ratcliffe extends the account of the 'background' nature of existential feelings by showing how they 'constitute the general space of possibilities that shapes ongoing experience and activity' (121f.), a point he then develops in terms of the phenomenological notion of 'horizon'.
"I am not among those who believe Iran is an existential issue for Israel."
Since Chomsky's (2001) above-mentioned Th/Ex approach constitutes a fundamental background for any work dealing with existential constructions and with participle structures generally speaking, I will dedicate the remainder of this section to a brief description of the motivation behind it and to the criticism that it has evoked.
'The Malays are made to believe that they had lost political power and their rights, ethnicity, religion and culture are facing an existential threat.
"A no-deal Brexit presents an existential threat to our industry," he said.