exertional rhabdomyolysis


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ex·er·tion·al rhab·do·my·ol·y·sis

rhabdomyolysis produced in those susceptible by muscular exercise.
Episodic haemoglobinuria due to haemolysis caused by repeated mechanical injury to red cells that travel through small vessels overlying the bones of hands and feet in long-distance marching—soldiers, marathon running, calisthenics, karate
Lab Myoglobinuria, proteinuria, increased BUN, increased enzymes—e.g., creatinine phosphokinase, increased lactic acid
References in periodicals archive ?
As with exertional rhabdomyolysis, hematuria can rise from metabolic and/or environmental factors such as dehydration, strenuous exercise, and acidosis.
Although the overall effects of SCT are benign, many studies and case reports have identified that individuals with SCT are at an increased risk for rare conditions including exertional rhabdomyolysis with prolonged physical activity, compartment syndrome, and sudden cardiac death [6].
Fortin, "Bilateral, exercise-induced thigh compartment syndrome diagnosed as exertional rhabdomyolysis. A case report and review of the literature," American Journal of Sports Medicine, vol.
Compared to 0.8 percent of the soldiers without sickle cell trait who developed exertional rhabdomyolysis, just over 1 percent of black soldiers with the trait developed the condition, Kurina said.
We report the case of a young, active duty SCT positive African American male presenting with exertional rhabdomyolysis complicated by myoglobinuric renal failure requiring hemodialysis.
Reasonableness and foreseeability are central to a legal analysis of exertional rhabdomyolysis. The concern is whether rhabdomyolysis is a reasonably foreseeable consequence of strenuous or prolonged exertion during exercise and sports events.
Muldoon, "Exertional rhabdomyolysis and malignant hyperthermia in a patient with ryanodine receptor type 1 gene, L-type calcium channel a-1 subunit gene, and calsequestrin-1 gene polymorphisms," Anesthesiology, vol.
The policy resulted from a legal settlement with the family of Dale Lloyd II, a Rice University football player, who collapsed during football practice and later died from acute exertional rhabdomyolysis attributed to SCT (Figure 1).
But as the diagnosis emerged - exertional rhabdomyolysis - the questions lingered: How did it happen?
Leading causes of non-traumatic, non-cardiac sports death are exertional hyperthermia, followed by exertional rhabdomyolysis and status asthmaticus.
Eichner opened the meeting with the keynote address on exertional rhabdomyolysis. In additional presentations, he discussed sickle cell trait and sudden death and strategies for the exertional cramper.