exempt


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exempt

(ĕg-zĕmpt′, ĭg-) [L. eximere, to take out, release, free]
Free from oversight or supervision by any regulation or authority.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the rules would only apply to exempt employees, you wouldn't be required to make changes to your non-exempt employees' pay.
Often under state laws, annuities and life insurance policies are seen as assets and can be used as investment vehicles that are exempt from attachment by creditors.
This, however, assumes you have Connie correctly classified as exempt, which brings us to an additional issue raised by the information you provided in your question: Do you have Connie - or the rest of your administrative staff - correctly classified as exempt from minimum wage and overtime rules?
Distortions in VAT recovery can also arise where a fully taxable business makes an auxiliary exempt supply, e.g., a manufacturer makes a loan to an affiliate.
Income from municipal bonds may also be exempt from state, county, and city income taxes.
"Thirteen-hundred graduate student assistants were on a paid salary basis as exempt. When the new pay level came in at $455/week, relatively few met that criteria," explains Casanova.
Investment-type joint ventures involve the participation of an exempt organization in a limited or passive capacity.
If any reporter makes less than $23,660, he or she is not exempt from overtime pay requirements regardless of any other factor.
* Outside sales employees can be exempt only if they primarily perform their job away from the employer's place of business (i.e., visiting customers).
Shreve is one of more than 5 million state and local government employees now exempt from Social Security.
Long-term care facilities should start by ensuring that they are not misclassifying "nonexempt" employees as "exempt" to avoid pay for overtime.
The terms of art used in this situation are "exempt" and "non-exempt".