excrescent


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excrescent

(ĭk-skrĕs′ənt)
adj.
1. Growing out abnormally, excessively, or superfluously.
2. Linguistics Of or relating to epenthesis; epenthetic.

ex·cres′cent·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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The threat here seems to emerge from boundaries being threatened, from a feminine excess which needs restraint, of fat, cigarette-smoking, beer-drinking men who have become a drain on the social body (they leak, they weep, they rage: excrescent and grotesque).
So, although Spinoza had the right ambition to develop a system of nature in a way that Schelling greatly admires and further pursues, he ultimately failed to do so by denying nature's dynamism, and hence opposing nature to the excrescent free spirit: 'if he had posited living substance instead of dead, blind substance, then the dualism of attributes would have offered him a means of really grasping the finitude of things'.
Moreover, as can be seen in long scale RF spectrum (the insert), there is not any excrescent frequency components except the fundamental and harmonic frequency components, further confirming the stability of our fiber laser and single soliton operation.
To remove excrescent samples, the powder was homogenized in 1 mL TRIzol reagent (Takara, Dalian, China) and centrifuged at 12,000xg for 10 min at 4[degrees]C until the samples were adequately dissolved, and the supernatant was obtained.
The soft-NMS with a threshold of 0.6 is used to eliminate a big number of excrescent boxes.
This figure is noteworthy because he is one of the most famous early examples of a chui-hs[ddot{u}] [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] ("excrescent son-in-law"), that is, a husband who is forced on account of indigence to reside with his wife's family.
Z, 'Z), an S-series (S, si, sy), an S-series with excrescent -t (ST, sith, syth), the neuter hoc (a Latin loan?), and the plural ('L, 'L', ily, illi).
What I am identifying as a 'generic truth procedure' is the painstaking manner in which the elements of the situation are 'counted, both according to the prevailing regime of knowledge and, simultaneously, as being included within a separate (what Badiou would call 'excrescent') part of that same situation that is indiscernible from within the governing norms of representation.
mud-shit-fart-language chain of excrescent metaphors at work in How It
I do not see anything grossly inaccurate in the rendering of the torso, and the calf 'jumps' only when you focus on it to the exclusion of everything else; otherwise, it seems a necessary accent." Greenberg's answer is disingenuous, and he knew it (which is why he made no attempt to explain in what sense the excrescent calf was a necessity).