exclusion

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Related to exclusionary: Exclusionary Clause

exclusion

 [ek-skloo´zhun]
a shutting out or elimination; surgical isolation of a part, as of a segment of intestine, without removal from the body.

ex·clu·sion

(eks-klū'zhŭn),
A shutting out; disconnection from the main portion.
[L. ex- cludo, pp. -clusus, to shut out]

exclusion

Health insurance
A specific condition or circumstance for which the insurance policy will not provide benefits. 

Managed care
An item or service that Medicare or another healthcare payer does not cover—e.g., most prescription drugs, long-term care, custodial care in a nursing or private home.
 
Medspeak-UK
Exclusion from work; gardening leave. The removal of a person (generally understood to mean a health professional) from an NHS workplace when restriction is regarded as an insufficient measure, and justified where:
• There has been a critical incident where serious allegations have been made; or
• There has been a breakdown in relationships between a colleague and the rest of the team; or
• The presence of the practitioner is likely to hinder the formal investigation.

Key factors in exclusion:
• Protection of staff or patient interests; or
• To assist the investigative process.

The term is used by the National Clinical Assessment Authority in the UK, and is loosely equivalent to suspension; it is a manoeuvre reserved for only the most exceptional circumstances.

Social medicine
The deliberate shutting out of a person from a group to which he/she is entitled to belong or in whose activities he/she has the right to participate.
 
Vox populi
The removal of a thing; the taking of a thing “out of action”.

Amsterdam criteria

Oncology Criteria for diagnosing hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, see there.
Amsterdam criteria
Family history
Presence of histologically verified colorectal cancer in ≥ 3 relatives–one of whom is a 1st-degree relative of the other 2
'Vertical' history
Presence of disease in ≥ 2 successive generations
Age of onset
Age < 50 in > 1 affected relative
Exclusion
Hereditary polyposis syndromes have been excluded

ex·clu·sion

(eks-klū'zhŭn)
A shutting out; disconnection from the main portion.
[L. ex-cludo, pp. -clusus, to shut out]
References in periodicals archive ?
Before Weeks, only Iowa had adopted a generic exclusionary rule barring evidence discovered during an illegal search.
In support of his argument that the exclusionary rule's spike in popularity during Prohibition was not coincidental, Oliver delves into state court opinions in South Carolina, New York, Alabama, Oklahoma, Florida, and other states that enforced the exclusionary rule soon after Prohibition was established.
(34) But here, Oliver identifies a surprising incongruity: "[S]tate courts, even in states to adopt the exclusionary rule, did not generally adopt the idea, as the Supreme Court had in Wan, that coercion should be viewed like unlawful searches and the fruits excluded for similar reasons" (p.
In a separate study, Russell Skiba and Natasha Williams further revealed that black students in the same schools or districts were not engaged in levels of disruptive behavior that would warrant higher rates of exclusionary discipline than white peers.
Critics also say that exclusionary discipline is used too frequently in response to lower-level, nonviolent student behavior.
Advocates of discipline reform contend that exclusionary discipline may have adverse consequences for school climate.
Similarly, states have adopted a variety of exclusionary rules.
provided but also the exclusionary rules that remedy violations of those
(61) While the good faith exception, and other exceptions, to the exclusionary rule are not named specifically, it is blaringly obvious that the Court still feels the need for exceptions to the exclusionary rule to exist as these exclusions are mentioned as continuing to be applicable throughout the unanimous Riley decision.
(73) Moreover, the most shocking aspect regarding warrants is that the exclusionary rule, coined in Weeks, was the law of the land for almost seventy years, and for almost seventy years, this was the protection Americans believed the Fourth Amendment provided before being overruled and replaced with the idea that the Fourth Amendment protects police officers and the judicial system first, and American citizens second.
The evidence laundering cases make clear that an effective exclusionary rule must take an organizational perspective on police work.
Also in Part IV we evaluate the role of evidence laundering within the political economy of the exclusionary rule.