exclude


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

exclude

Informatics
verb To identify a file in an include-exclude listso as to prevent it from being backed up when a user or schedule issues an incremental or selective backup operation.
 
Medspeak
verb To eliminate or rule out a condition from consideration in a diagnostic evaluation or workup.

exclude

Medtalk verb To rule out (from diagnostic consideration)
References in periodicals archive ?
The CDC researchers couldn't exclude people who died in the first ten years because some of the participants were only followed for nine years.
This election is made by filing a return for the tax year of the sale or exchange of the taxpayer's principal residence that excludes the gain from gross income.
The limited warranty must be extended to the first owner of the home and survive the passing of title but may exclude any, or all, subsequent owners.
121 is applied first to exclude part or all of the realized gain; the remaining gain realized may be deferred in whole or in part if the taxpayer purchases another residence within the required time period and makes a Sec.
As Target illustrates, however, the same arguments can be used to exclude the testimony of accountants who offer expert opinions on damages in litigation.
Thus, an employee may exclude from gross income employer reimbursements for qualified parking expenses, but only if he or she actually incurred them.
93-88 provides that victims of disparate treatment discrimination may exclude all compensating damages, including backpay, from gross income because the Civil Rights Act of 1991 provides such victims a broad range of remedies not previously available to plaintiffs.
A plan cannot exclude part-time employees as a class even if actual plan coverage, after excluding part-time employees, would meet the minimum coverage test of IRC section 410(b).
Generally, such trusts are designed to take full advantage of the unified credit in the grantor's estate and exclude the corpus from the surviving spouse's estate.
On their joint return for the year of sale, T and M should report a taxable gain of $84,000 ($334,000-$250,000), because they are entitled to exclude the sum of each spouse's dollar limit amount, determined on a separate basis, as if they had not been married (zero for T, $250,000 for M).