excitor


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Related to excitor: excitor nerve

stim·u·lant

(stim'yū-lănt),
1. Stimulating; exciting to action.
See also: stimulus.
2. An agent that arouses organic activity, strengthens the action of the heart, increases vitality, and promotes a sense of well-being; classified according to the parts on which they chiefly act: cardiac, respiratory, gastric, hepatic, cerebral, spinal, vascular, genital.
See also: stimulus. Synonym(s): excitor, stimulator
Synonym(s): excitant
[L. stimulans, pres. p. of stimulo, pp. -atus, to goad, incite, fr. stimulus, a goad]

excitor

(ĭk-sī′tər)
n.
A nerve whose stimulation induces an increase in activity of the part it supplies.

excitor

(ek-si'tor) [L. excitare, to arouse]
Something that incites to greater activity. Synonym: stimulant
References in periodicals archive ?
Commenting on the partnership, Alison Henderson, VP sales and marketing at Excitor, said, "help AG is a well established and highly trusted security adviser and integrator in the region.
Alison Henderson, vice president, Sales and Marketing, Excitor,
The acceptance score was significantly lower than that of group Blocked, which was virtually equal to 0.5, revealing that the consumption of the CB compound was lower than the consumption of the excitor C in the experimental group.
Experiment 1 corroborated a previous observation from our lab showing that serial flavor-sucrose presentations to thirsty rats did not produce evidence of a preference over plain water when tested hungry, thus it was used as a control procedure for flavor conditioning in Experiment 2, which revealed that adding flavor B to the excitor flavor C produced a reduction in the consumption when comparing with the consumption of the excitor alone (i.e., summation effect).
The experiment in this report provided evidence of protection from extinction in a conditioned taste aversion preparation by performing extinction treatment with the target CS (S) conjointly with a second CS (A), consisting of either an excitor (group 0A-2AS) or an extensively extinguished CS (group 10A-2AS).
(2007), the finding that an excitor (group 0A-2AS) can protect the target CS from extinction can be interpreted as indicative of a putative second-order conditioning process.
Phase 3 consisted of a single presentation of a solution of 8 % sucrose (Flavor B, the test excitor) for 30 min followed by an injection of 0.15 M LiCl at 10 ml/kg of body.
An analysis of sucrose consumption (the known excitor for the subsequent summation test) on the conditioning trial revealed no group differences (F < 1).
Analyses were performed using a fluorescence microscope (Nikon Optiphot-2 and Quips Genetic Workstation; Nikon Inc, Melville, New York) equipped with Chroma Technology 83000 filter set with single band excitors for Texas Red/Rhodamine, FITC, and DAPI (ultraviolet 360 nm).
Use of the ABA fear renewal paradigm to assess the effects of extinction with co-present fear inhibitors or excitors: Implications for theories of extinction and for treating human fears and phobias.
Analysis was performed using a Nikon Optiphot-2 (Nikon Inc, Melville, New York) and Quips Genetic Workstation equipped with Chroma Technology filter set with single band excitors for Spectrum-Orange, Fluorescein isothiocyanate, 4'6-diamidino-2-pheyndole, (ultraviolet 360 nm) (Vysis).
On this view, the shock deprivation stimuli were functioning as simple conditioned excitors and/or the nonshock deprivation stimuli were conditioned inhibitors.